Skip to main content

More titles to consider

Loading...

Shopping Cart

You're getting the VIP treatment!

Item(s) unavailable for purchase
Please review your cart. You can remove the unavailable item(s) now or we'll automatically remove it at Checkout.
itemsitem
itemsitem

Ratings and Book Reviews ()

Overall rating

3.5 out of 5
5 Stars
3 reviews have 5 stars
4 Stars
4 reviews have 4 stars
3 Stars
3 reviews have 3 stars
2 Stars
0 reviews have 2 stars
1 Star
2 reviews have 1 stars

Share your thoughts

You've already shared your review for this item. Thanks!

We are currently reviewing your submission. Thanks!

Complete your review

All Book Reviews

  • Is the future almost here!

    We have machines that we can ask to switch the television on, or play a certain track of music. Then most people are constantly checking their Facebook page, twitter or adding a photo to Instagram. Technology is taking over. Now the wizards of technology are working on driverless cars. So who know what will come next, will it be a whole house where every need is anticipated by AI. There are two stories running alongside each other through this novel, one where it appears a young girl is telling how her father had tried to murder her. Then the other and main part of the story is of the Rhodes family. Nikki and Ethan Rhodes had gone through so much, they had lost their daughter Grace in a tragic road accident. Their other daughter Bella hasn’t spoken a word since that day, all her communications are done through an iPad. The family decides that they need to move house, to make a complete fresh start, they see a house which is newly designed by Catriona Fisher a house of the future. The house has everything you could wish for and more, it seems to be the ideal solution, it will be safe and secure which is what they feel they need. But how safe will they really be in 17 Church row? Far from being their dream home, this becomes more like a nightmare, where everything is going well until it isn’t! Alice a sophisticated AI controls the house, she knows when Vikki is having a panic attack and can calm her down, calm her breathing, this reducing her heart rate. But what if Alice decides she wants to take over everything? What if she wants to manipulate the people in the house? If she sees them as inferior. The story is told through three POV the main one is Nikki, the panic attacks are described with such accuracy, how debilitating anxiety and panic can be. Having personally suffered from this for many years the description was spot on by the author. The second point of view is that of Catriona Fisher. The final narrator is more sinister with chapters dotted through the book. There are a few plot twists through the book. I’m not sure how far these things could go as it will be in the future, if anything like this is ever invented, as far as we know! I liked Nikki her character was totally believable and relatable. The plot itself was good, something different and engaging. I would like to thank # Netgalley and #Zaffrepublishers for an eARC of this book in exchange for an honest, fair and unbiased review.

    Thanks for your feedback!

    1 person found this review helpful

    1 people found this review helpful

    1 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • A creepy tale of technology gone awry

    ‘A computer that can think for itself? That’s a little too science fiction, if you ask me.’ Nikki is desperate to move house after the death of one of her children – a new house equals a new start for them all. Their new house has the latest in AI technology built to anticipate their every need – what could possibly go wrong? 17 Church Row is an interesting and prophetic read particularly in an age where many households have Google Home or Alexa to help them out. I liked the slow build of the plot although I could see where it was going in a lot of places. I also liked the build up and speeding up of pace throughout which kept me gripped to see what would happen next. Nikki is a very relatable main character – an overprotective mother dealing with grief of losing her child and who suffers from anxiety. However, I did find the plot a little bit predictable in places – the flashbacks in particular were written too obviously – you could tell who was narrating them from almost the beginning. This meant the reveal didn’t work quite as well as it could have done but then there’s a twist in the action that I didn’t see coming which kept my interest. In the ARC kindle edition the change in perspective isn’t quite formatted correctly with means that you are jerked out of the story with a truly odd change of tone that you weren’t expecting. There was also a couple of odd things in the tech side of it that I should point out – a computer engineer trying to destroy a computer program by smashing his monitors first isn’t very realistic – monitors have nothing to do with software! Overall 17 Church Row is a creepy tale of technology gone awry but was a little too predictable in some areas for me. Thank you to NetGalley & Bonnier Books UK – Zaffre for the chance to read the ARC in exchange for an honest review.

    Thanks for your feedback!

    0 person found this review helpful

    0 people found this review helpful

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful

  • 17 Church Row

    Scary, chilling. A glimpse into the future of AI. This had me holding my breathe so many times. Not at all what I was expecting.

    Thanks for your feedback!

    0 person found this review helpful

    0 people found this review helpful

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful

  • Futuristic... or Current?

    17 Church Row is just a house. A house with a very advanced internal AI, Alice, who takes care of everything. When Nikki moves in along with her husband Ethan and their 7 year old daughter Bella, she is excited for a change of scenery, but uncertain about the sleek, modern, smart house. This may be the catalyst for healing and moving into a new phase of life, or it may be just another step towards desolation and depression. This book had me excited from the get go. I am very interested in modern accessible AI systems, and not altogether convinced about them. This story does the job of both highlighting why they can be so fantastically freeing and helpful for daily life, as well as why there is good reason to be hesitant about relying too heavily on automation and Artificial Intelligence. The more advanced they become, the less glitches and issues will plague us. However, the more advanced they become the more unexpected their responses will be, and we could very quickly find ourselves in uncomfortable and unforeseen circumstances. I'm not even talking "killer robots, taking over the world", I am talking more simple things like the scene in this book, where Nikki is exercising and when the pool's filter system causes a short, Alice decides to divert all power to fixing the issue, leaving Nikki trapped in the dark in a room with no door handles. These things are just bound to happen, as AI learns what is acceptable and what is not, not being themselves human. I enjoyed the multi faceted story, as it showed Nikki's journey through grief and fear, trying to heal herself and Bella, as well as their new life in 17 Church Row, the story of the architect's journey, and the letter-like contributions from the unknown character. It all tied together to make a more interesting and complex story than it would have been without any of those threads. I have heard other people saying that they find this story unbelievable, but I enjoyed the sci-fi aspect, which suspends disbelief in what is possible technologically. This story is high intensity, without a moment of breathing space. It s full on from page one, and although that was a bit exhausting at times, I think overall it added to the stress-filled anxiety of the piece. Recommended to lovers of modern sci-fi, and conspiracy theorists who enjoy scaring themselves about the impending robot takeover.

    Thanks for your feedback!

    0 person found this review helpful

    0 people found this review helpful

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful

  • An enjoyable read......

    I haven’t read any James Carol books before but I do own “Kiss Me, Kill Me” and I’m fully aware that he is a respected writer with several crime novels already under his belt. “17 Church Row” is a techno thriller like no other and it really does need to be read to be believed. Not so many moons ago, this story would have been classed as futuristic even science fiction. Scarily, now a lot of the story’s premise could be described as very realistic and utterly believable. What the future holds with regards to artificial and even ‘actual’ intelligence is something that is very hard to comprehend and quite scary but with the modern ‘Alexa’ and ‘Siri’ in our households, nothing is unachievable and more and more, robots and AI are taking over manual tasks. The first half of the book is a slow burn, getting you used to the state of the art house in question with it’s technology and being introduced to the family who have bought it and moved in there. I did feel the emotions Bella’s parents felt due to the accidental death of her sister very palpable and truly understood Nikki’s anguish and panic attacks relating to her feelings of grief. I didn’t particularly like any of the main characters, though I did take to Catriona the architect of the house and thought she played her part in the story well. This book opens with a superbly intriguing prologue that remains a thread throughout the story and doesn’t become apparent how it entwines itself within the main premise till later in the book and is quite a twist. The denouement is fast paced and I felt it did save the book after a very slow first half. Although a lot of readers may find “17 Church Row” strange or even frightening, I did enjoy reading and appreciated how the author was conveying the message of how AI may take over the function of humans one day in an interesting and well written crime thriller. If you fancy something a bit different, I’d happily recommend this book but if you like your crime mysteries to be traditional and straight forward this may not be for you. Intelligent, chilling and well worth a read! 3.5 stars

    Thanks for your feedback!

    0 person found this review helpful

    0 people found this review helpful

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful

You can read this item using any of the following Kobo apps and devices:

  • DESKTOP
  • eREADERS
  • TABLETS
  • IOS
  • ANDROID