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Ratings and Book Reviews ()

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  • The Boat Girl

    This is the story of the Boat Girls working for The Grand Union Canal Carrying Company in WWII. These young women some of them only seventeen did a man's work carrying cargo such as coal, wool, timber, cement, sand, iron and shells for explosives on narrow boats down inland canals. In 1948 they were given badges with the initials IW for Inland Waterways. It is a part of history which I did not know about before reading this book. The book is fiction, but it is based on these events in history. Ronnie, which is short for Veronique, is the youngest of three sisters. Her other two sisters are working for the war effort. Ronnie applied to be a land girl because she is an outside girl and loves working outside. She was turned down because she was too you. She saw a clip about the boat girls at the movies in a newsreel and decided that was what she wanted to do for the war effort. The story follows Ronnie as she trains to be a boat girl. Three young girls in the front narrow boat and three in the barge boat in the back. Very small spaces for three people. the story is about the boat girls, but it is about relationships between these young women and their own personal stories. How these young women dealt with the cold, the crowding, the hard work, the relationships and life in general during the times of rationing and war. It is also Ronnie's story of her growing up during this time. Her attraction to two different young men and how she dealt with this and decided what was the best way forward for her. Her friend ship with her trainer, and with the other girls. Heartbreak with the disastrous loss of her friend Margaret and the cat Lucky she left behind. I loved the characters and the historical content. It is a good third book in the series about these three sisters. I read the first two and loved this one just as much. I really enjoyed this book and would recommend it. Thanks to Molly Green, Avon books, UK and NetGalley for allowing me to read and review and advanced copy of the book.

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  • WWII

    The third book in the series, but you can read it as a standalone. I haven’t read the other books but was able to follow the story without problems. The story is about Ronniw who goes to work on the Canal Board and it follows her journey from the first training days. The story is mostly about Ronnie's own personal journey, she really grows up during the training and her relationship with the other trainees and her first love. There wasn’t as much story or details about the actual canal boats as I hoped for, but nevertheless I enjoyed the story.

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  • PageTurner canals Romance

    This is the third of a series, but all are stand-alones! Three sisters fight for independence from an overbearing, but caring mother. Ronnie tries various avenues but Wartime offers little choices for a 17 year old girl. She takes matters into her hands after she sees a poster for females to work the canals since the men are all away at war. The author not only gives us glimpses of the life of canal life, but also the life within the confines of those tiny boats for families. How does love sustain on these waters? What about if you meet a gent who has a position on the land ? How hard would it be to give up the life on the water? All this and so much more is shown to young Ronnie including some characters of questionable ethics? I would recommend this book and the whole series! I received this free advanced copy from NetGalley and these are my willingly given thoughts and opinions.

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  • Beautiful and Refreshingly Unique

    Prior to reading this, my knowledge of those working on canals transporting important cargo during WWII Britain was miniscule and, in fact, I didn't know that women were involved. Such an interesting perspective from these courageous young women which makes for excellent reading. Though based on the war, the book's focus is on the duties and relationships of these women as they trained very hard for what they did. It required intense physical work as well as mental strain. Space on the narrowboats was very tight for the two or three women who shared quarters. Even mundane tasks were difficult, more difficult than I realized. Ronnie's mother and sisters are also prominent in the book. We see relationships evolve over time. Both of Ronnie's sisters are involved in the war effort so when her third daughter wishes to join, her mother is aghast and terrified at being left alone. But she realizes her daughter is determined so finally relents, reluctantly. Ronnie (or Veronique) is so smitten with the idea of working with the Grand Union Canal Co. that she signs up and lies about her age. Her mother is aghast and at first strongly resists. However, determined Ronnie follows through with her plan, finally with her mother's blessing. Training is incredibly difficult under super strict Dora. The girls must also grow accustomed to being a team in tandem, at work and rest (which was rare). This book takes us on the journey of Ronnie, her friends and colleagues as well as romantic interests. Along with the descriptions of the training (so well done I could visualize myself on the boat!) there are mysteries and many secrets which emerge. Things are not always as they first appear. There is heartache but also beautiful hope. Fans of Historical Fiction, Mystery and Women's Fiction ought to read this adventurous book. This is only my third by this author but I am remedying that! The author's notes at the back moved me very much. My sincere thank you to Avon Books UK and NetGalley for providing me with an ARC of this intriguing and unique book in exchange or an honest

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  • Conclusion to series!

    A Sister’s War by Molly Green is the 3rd book in The Victory Sisters. This book can be read as a standalone, but I did enjoy reading the series in order. I thought A Sister’s War was well-written with developed characters. In this book, we get Veronique “Ronnie” Linfoot’s story. She is the youngest of the three Linfoot sisters and she is anxious to do something to aid the war effort. She is not yet seventeen which makes it difficult for her to join a program. Ronnie was turned down for the Land Girls which was her preference. Her mother, Simone was delighted. Simone would prefer that her daughters wear pretty dresses, do embroidery and other ladylike tasks. Unfortunately, Simone has three independent, rebellious daughters. Raine is a pilot with the Air Transport Auxiliary and Suzy is a singer with ENSA. Ronnie sees a newsreel that mentions the canal girls and she sets out to learn more information. Ronnie applies to be boatwoman transporting goods along the Grand Union Canal with the Grand Union Canal Company. We follow Ronnie and five other ladies training with Dora Dummitt who is a harsh taskmaster. The author did her research for this book. I can envision life on the canal in the narrowboats from the author’s descriptions. It sounded like a rough job with long hours. I could not imagine having to open and close the locks along the canal by hand. The cold and wet were relentless. The boats were small with limited room. It was fascinating learning about the canal girls. They transported items needed for the war effort. I was curious after I finished the book and looked up more information about the canal and the boats (transport by boat ended in the late 1970s and the boats are now being used for people to live in). I like that we get to catch up with Ronnie’s sisters, Suzy and Raine. A Sister’s War is a satisfying conclusion to The Victory Sisters trilogy. I enjoyed reading A Sister’s War as well as the other two books in this engaging historical series.

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