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Ratings and Book Reviews ()

Overall rating

4.1 out of 5
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  • Can’t stop thinking about it 💖

    Axiom’s End didn’t feel easy to slip into. In its opening I felt like lots of arbitrary information was being thrown at me, resulting in characters I found difficult to engage with emotionally. At first. Until I met Olive and the dogs, anyway ☺️ What kept me going was the fascinating Bush-era alternative history, and the fresh wit of the writing. However, as understanding grew, so did connection. It became clear the early details of the family at the centre of the book were carefully placed, and the emotion arrived a-plenty—even in relationships which became broken beyond repair. In this way, it hit similar notes to ET or Close Encounters, with a dysfunctional family it is initially difficult to connect with, but heartfully rendered over the course of the story. —•— The alternative noughties history combined with hindsight to triangulate of some of the truths of the era and provoke fresh thought. The theme of “truth”—as a building block, a battering ram, even as a barrier—ran throughout, one of the story’s twin-hearts, beating beside language. How can we connect with others (alien and human alike) with fundamentally different experiences to us, and who we perceive as models our minds construct from our selves? Does this disconnect leave us all on some levels ultimately alone? Can we bridge the divides, and at what cost? —•— The book quickly became moreish and kept me up past my bedtime: so this authorial objective achieved with aplomb. It did not give me all the happy endings I wanted, which increased the pay-off for the unexpected ending it *did* offer. Its wrap-up felt truthy and bittersweet, leaving me with feelings and ideas I will be mulling for some days. It will certainly stand up to second and third readings, to better appreciate the details and nuances we can miss when caught up in such an effective page-turner. —•— So thank you Lindsay Ellis, Axiom’s End is a real gift 🙏🏻 I never got into Transformers, but I imagine this is how the franchise *should* have been done 🤖💖✨

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  • The story I didn't know I needed.

    Reading Axiom's End has been a fascinating experience through a colourful array of emotions, each as intense and vivid than the last, if not more. All without losing a fresh voice that sucks you into the book from page one.

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  • Terrible

    I found this book to be so trite and juvenile, I couldn't even finish it. Her unnecessary pop culture references, her vague characterisation, poor research quality (the CIA guy? Come on) everything was awkward as if she was fumbling her way through the story. Also needs more editing. Don't waste your money.

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