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  • Dense but lucid examination

    Ben Goldacre is a very angry man, with good reason. In this book he lays out how the pharmaceutical industry has distorted drug research in pursuit of profit, sometimes intentionally, sometimes entirely without malice but with equally devastating effects for patient welfare. This matters because patients are prescribed less effective drugs, or drugs which are outright harmful, at huge financial expense to those paying for the drugs. This isn’t a conspiracy theory book; Goldacre is quite clear that many valuable drugs have come out of the industry, and that most of the people who work in it want to make better drugs. He sets out in detail how and why bias is introduced into both research and prescribing practices, putting it in layman’s terms but linking to the research papers and court documents that back up what he’s saying. He also addresses the failings of the current regulatory system, and proposes ways to improve things — pointing out that unless real controls with serious financial penalties are put in place, even those companies which genuinely want to reform will be under commercial pressure to continue with bad practice in a race to the bottom. It’s a dense and at times exhausting read. But Goldacre has done a decent job of making the issue accessible to a wide audience with a direct interest, from patients to practising doctors and academics. You can skim a lot of the book to get the general gist, or you can read it in details without following the links, or you can dig into research material he drew on and has laid out in meticulous footnotes and citations. He concludes the original edition with practical suggestions about what individual people can do to improve things, often simply by asking questions. I read the second edition, which has a “what happened next” chapter about the reaction to the first edition. As he had predicted, there was a backlash in an attempt to discredit him — but there was also a lot of covert feedback from industry personnel acknowledging the problems and considering how to improve things. While there’s always a “the lurkers support me in email” issue with uncredited sources, he does also offer some examples of companies which have publicly moved to improve transparency. Bad Pharma is an angry but rational examination of a real problem that affects millions of people, including almost anyone reading this review. It’s a worthwhile read, even if it makes for uncomfortable reading for patients, doctors and companies alike.

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  • Eye opening

    Ben Goldacre has delivered again exposing not just the Drug companies, but the lack of rules and regulations in this field. A must read for anyone affected by this field which in my opinion is everyone.

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  • great work by a few good doctors

    Book is very informative. exposes lies of Big pharma with examples. big pharma manipulated research data so that Drugs -which are harmful -can be sold to patients. One example mentioned in this book is about diabetes drug Rosiglitazone(drug name Avandia) from Glaxo smithkline. In the year 2007 Dr john buse of North carolina proved that this drug increases chance of heart attacks. Dr Buse was proved right and later Glaxo faced 10,000s of lawsuits and withdrew the drug. This world needs more such ethical doctors like Dr john buse. This also exposes the faulty methods of USFDA doctors as being corrupt.

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