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  • Smart book

    Makes a great point, explains a lot of current and past culture through the perspective of a Native American outlook. Very much enjoyed.

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  • Not bad, but very redundant

    While I agree with Forbes' main thesis (the one in which he argues that capitalism/imperialism are damaging our world and lifestlyes and that atrocities were committed during the european conquest of the 'uncivilized' world), he's manner of writing is very redundant and his arguments start losing their poignancy when he compares every single regime he doesn't agree with to the Nazi Germany, or when he says that "the conquest of space is just an excuse to go lay waste to all of existence". He does raise good points and arguments, indeed, but by the end it seemed to me like he had lost sight of what he had been talking about, given that the solution he poses to all the problems he talks about is to "connect with spirituality in the same way native americans did and do". That by itself is not a bad statement, and in a way it coincides with his description of the wétikos as a spiritual disease, but it's far fetched to think that it will solve all the problems. Overall an interesting read at points, ommitting the first 8 chapters or so in which he just repeats the same arguments over and over. Only after those does it get more interesting. Daniel Quinn and Thomas King have presented similar arguments in better and ore compelling ways, I believe.

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