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  • Just what I've been looking for.

    Every grown up needs one.

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  • Punctuation: an endangered system

    PUNCTUATION: THE ENDANGERED SYSTEM An appreciation by Phillip Taylor MBE and Elizabeth Taylor of Richmond Green Chambers A great piece of humour and yet with a serious aim, this little book has become a runaway bestseller overnight and rightly so. As Lynne Truss has explained, there are many people who have little idea of the basics of punctuation today. This does not surprise us in the slightest. As examiners, we have found scant regard continues to be paid to full stops, commas and question marks. However, by far the number one serial offender is the missing apostrophe. The story of the panda eating in a restaurant, then shoots the restaurant up and departs is an amusing story with an important message. The placing of punctuation in the wrong place can completely alter the message being conveyed… at some cost. “A revolution in punctuation”, this book has been dedicated to the memory of the striking Bolshevik printers in St Petersburg who, in 1905, demanded to be paid the same rate for punctuation marks as for letters, and thereby directly precipitated the first Russian Revolution. We have come a long way in over 100 years and the main casualty has been the written word. The ‘shorthand’ we have encountered in the last six years using the internet is enough to convince us that this book should be compulsory reading in schools hence a schools edition in 2006 with illustrations. Besides, this book is a good read and very funny in places. To sell 50,000 copies in just over a week on release is a great achievement! It is true to say that the book makes a powerful case for the preservation of the system of what is interestingly described as ‘printing conventions’. However, this is not a book for pedants but for everyone, including members of the Bar who write lengthy Opinions and the judges who read them. It has never surprised me how cross the Judiciary become when they see sloppy legal paperwork. We expect it from solicitors but we must maintain a very high standard at the Bar, even with the infernal internet and toxic text messages. Well done, Lynne for reminding us of our legal roots. ‘Sticklers unite’ she says, ‘you have nothing to lose but your sense of proportion – and arguably you didn’t have much of that to begin with’. Do look at the end of the book for a fine bibliography – all the usual suspects are there including one Bill Bryson and his ‘Troublesome Words’, and the excellent Philip Howard’s ‘The State of the Language: English observed.’ “Eats, Shoots and Leaves” remains a 21st century book to treasure for what could become an endangered system.

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  • A must-have in any writer's library.

    Punctuation can be a little tricky. If you need a quick guide to remind yourself of the rules, this book is for you. Or maybe not. The book is written with a conversational tone and not as a stuffy reference book. As the author says: “you know those self-help books that give you permission to love yourself? This one gives you permission to love punctuation”. I enjoyed the writer’s anecdotes highlighting the misuse (and abuse) of punctuation in everyday life. All the punctuation rules are explained and one can easily mark the pages for reference purposes using flags or post-its. If you’d like to read about something serious (punctuation) in a tongue-in-the-cheek manner, this book is for you.

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  • Educative, witty & lots of fun with punctuation!

    About the Author: Lynne Truss is one of the best loved Britain's comic writers. Lynne Truss is an English author, journalist, novelist, and radio broadcaster and dramatist. This book was inspired by a BBC Radio show about punctuation, Cutting a Dash. It was presented by her. Presentation: The book is an imprint of HarperCollinsPublishers & printed on a FSC certified paper. Font type and size is pleasing to eyes. The book has 7 sections sans any chapter nos to lend uniqueness to the way Author liked to present. Persuading the readers that each punctuation mark is important. # Introduction: The Seventh Sense # The Tractable Apostrophe # That"ll Do, Comma # Airs and Graces, # Cutting a Dash # A Little used punctuation Mark # Merely Conventional Signs The way it is written for any stickler or not so stickler of the written word is a delight to read. Her witty and humour filled expressions; personification of a punctuation would get even the most mundane reader to splits and admire it; the personification, that is. It keeps the reader hooked on. The wit & humour is used; such that the serious message is nailed in with ease. One needs to read it; to appreciate & enjoy. Witty, Educative & Funny ! The simple ? to her looks like a sea-horse. I bet, now when you see one; you would also look at question mark - not as a mere question mark - but a sea-horse looking back at the sentence that precedes. The author is so dedicated to using the punctuation correctly that she even advocates to form a Vigilante group of Apostrophe society which is armed with- correction fluid, big pens, stickers in various sizes to stick over wrong apostrophes and so on.... Would you like to join her campaign in promoting the correct usage....Be brave go on...it is worth for a noble cause. The book ends with a Bibliography that reflects the kind of research the Author has done before setting out to pen this remarkable book on a simple yet important subject : the punctuation. Highly recommended book around at present time to save the literary world! The book invites one to really enjoy the written word and pay attention to the nuances of the written world. As long as we have Authors like her; the print media has a bright future in-spite of the web world encroaching upon it so determinedly. Go folks; go for this treasure book and ensure you have one in the personal collection & gifting. Good for all ages. Young, old, & not so old.

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