More titles to consider

Shopping Cart

You're getting the VIP treatment!

Item(s) unavailable for purchase
Please review your cart. You can remove the unavailable item(s) now or we'll automatically remove it at Checkout.
itemsitem
itemsitem
Ratings and Book Reviews (1 2 star ratings
1 reviews
)

Overall rating

5.0 out of 5
2
5 Stars 4 Stars 3 Stars 2 Stars 1 Star
2 0 0 0 0

Share your thoughts

You've already shared your review for this item. Thanks!

We are currently reviewing your submission. Thanks!

Complete your review

All Book Reviews

  • 0 person found this review helpful

    0 people found this review helpful

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful

    Thanks for your feedback!

    Read the book and be inspired

    Last year, I received this book as a Father’s Day gift. I rarely read a paper book; usually only in medical waiting rooms or on a train when taking my computer for doing my work is not convenient. So, I’ve only just finished it now. John MacLean was an up-and-coming champion athlete in several sports. Somehow, he excelled at whatever sport he tried. Then, at 22 years of age, he was riding his brand new racing bike when an 8 ton truck hit him. He survived against expectations but was paralysed from the waist down, with minimal function in his legs. An MRI much later showed that, of the 3 million nerves passing through the spinal cord, he had a few thousand left. He became a wheelchair-bound champion. He swam the English Channel, competed in triathlons and ironman contests, including the toughest in the world, by using his wheelchair instead of running, and working a hand-operated bike on the cycling leg. He won a silver medal at the Paralympics in Beijing. But all this was second best. What he dreamed of was walking again. 25 years after his accident, he did, thanks to a revolutionary therapy by Ken Ware. OK, this is the skeleton the story is built on. The real message is the attitude that made all this possible. John wasn’t “lucky” in achieving all this, but rather “lucky” in believing that he could burst through any barrier if he tried hard enough. And this attitude is something all of us can copy. He was often in agony, but he kept going. When he couldn’t keep going, he returned and had another go, and went through the pain and kept going anyway. Read the book and be inspired.
2

You can read this item using any of the following Kobo apps and devices:

  • DESKTOP
  • eREADERS
  • TABLETS
  • IOS
  • ANDROID
  • BLACKBERRY
  • WINDOWS