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Ratings and Book Reviews (3 11 star ratings
3 reviews
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4.3 out of 5
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  • 7 person found this review helpful

    7 people found this review helpful

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    In My Opinion, A Very Disingenuous Account

    I followed the actual trial back in 2011, and I bought this book under the assumption that it was a "true" story. The name of the criminal case is Commonwealth v. Covington. The case number is 06-CR-62. The case was tried in Bourbon Circuit Court in Paris, Kentucky, and a video was made of the proceedings. Here are a few of my observations. 1. At trial, Sharon Muse (the author of this book) did not tell the jury about the Defendant's supposed threat -- "I will kill you. It doesn't matter if you get away. I'm going to kill you. It may be tomorrow, it may be next year. But I will kill you." You won't see this on the video. I can't believe Ms. Muse included this alleged "threat" in her book. 2. At trial, Ms. Muse didn't tell the jury about the supposed items (duct tape and rope) inside the Defendant's green duffle bag. You won't see this on the video. 3. Ms. Muse's assertion to the contrary, the prosecutors fought to convict the Defendant of sexual abuse. The prosecutors called Ms. Muse as a witness and she testified that the Defendant had put his hand on her breast. In addition, the prosecutors introduced Ms. Muse's certified medical records (which document scrape marks on her chest" and introduced pictures of those scrape marks. During his closing argument, the assistant prosecutor asked the jury to convict the Defendant of sexual abuse. 4. Ms. Muse took a blood test at the hospital. The results of the test were included in Ms. Muse's certified medical records. Certified medical records are self-authenticating and are admissible into evidence without a witness. At trial, the State Trooper merely read the test results from Ms. Muse's certified medical records (which the prosecutors properly introduced without objection as Exhibit #20). If Ms. Muse blood had been tested at the crime lab (instead of at the hospital), the prosecutors would have had to call the technician who had performed the test. 5. As mentioned above, the prosecutors introduced Ms. Muse's certified medical records. These records, which went back to the jury during deliberations, document that Ms. Muse arrived at the hospital by ambulance. Ms. Muse asserts that the prosecutors didn't clear up this point. 6. Ms. Muse claims that the jury never saw the Defendant's knife. This is technically true. The knife had been destroyed following the Defendant's botched guilty plea in 2007. It appeared at the time that the case had been resolved. Fortunately, the authorities had taken a picture of the Defendant's knife and this was shown to the jury (and admitted without objection as an exhibit). Ms. Muse, however, leaves this part out of her book. 7. The prosecutors convicted the Defendant of kidnapping and persistent felony offender, first degree. The defendant received the maximum possible sentence (Life) along with the maximum possible parole eligibility (20 years). In Kentucky, a defendant cannot receive a greater sentence (or parole eligibility) unless he or she stands convicted of an aggravated murder. The case was regarded in Kentucky's 14th Judicial Circuit as a tremendous win for the prosecutors. Such are my thoughts. Having followed the trial back in 2011, I find Sharon Muse's book to be a very disingenuous account of the case of Commonwealth v. Covington.
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    Kidnapped by a Client

    I was swept up by the intensity of the crime,the mistakes made and choice taken to get back her life. The incredible bravery in standing up for ones rights and to see justice done I applaud her for revealing the immense faith that held her up. This book is written from the heart and should speak to the heart of those who read it. Can't recommend it enough.
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    unable to put this book down

    Pretty much from the first page I was hooked! I felt so much anger on behalf of the victim! I’ve been a police officer in Canada for 25 years and the police work done in this case was appalling, next only to the prosecution! It’s hard to believe that such incompetent people work in law enforcement and justice system. What a shame this woman had to try to steer the investigation and preserve evidence while she was still in shock from the attack! Unbelievable what she went through and where she ended up. My hat is off to this woman for surviving the “criminals justice system” and going on to make a better system for everyone involved, especially the victim. I think the process of election of Prosecutors needs to be scrapped. Clearly in this case the prosecutor was not interested in prosecuting hard to prove cases which immediately révictimized the victims because it took away their ability to get justice. Shame on the prosecutor who is more interested in re-election than doing right by people who have been victimized and shame on the police who are too lazy or uneducated to conduct a straightforward investigation like this. Shame on the US for creating this system and not seeing that it needs to be completely overhauled.
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