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Ratings and Book Reviews ()

Overall rating

4.4 out of 5
5 Stars
16 reviews have 5 stars
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All Book Reviews

  • Still amazing

    Read it for my English exams when i was 18. Haven’t read it since, untill now at 46.Cried my eyes out, but what a wonderfully written book it still is. An emotional rollercoaster of a story, gripping storylines and characters.

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  • A classic

    Captivating writing. Great fiction and convincing characters make this a classic.

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  • Great Book

    Great book, very, very sad… Scary in current uncertain times.

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  • Brilliant and So relevant Today

    Must have read this when I was about fourteen and living in Malta. Dad was serving there with the British Army and although published in 1957 (before I was even born) the book proved massively popular. It’s deeply moving. Especially as it personalises the story of Nuclear Armageddon through the lives of its main characters. There’s a wonderful part in the last few chapters where two parents, already poisoned by radio active fallout, have to decide on giving a lethal injection to their baby Daughter who is also shortly going to die. Read the story for what happens but the scene is domestic, individual and touching. It’s not like all the nuclear Missiles going off in the film that even scared Ronald Reagan ‘The Day After Tomorrow’ One character says even our ‘Newspapers could have told the truth and perhaps stopped the War’ but we like our Newspapers full of ‘curvy beach ball girls’ and nobody, at least no Government was going to change that winning formula. Just like we like our Newspapers full of Heroes and Villains. The good guys and the Bad guys. Black and circumstances. We like our Newspapers papers to only tell the ‘truth’ that we like to hear. This book is titled from a line in T S Elliott’s poem that says (and this is not an exact quote) ‘here on the beach, amid the timid river, we move together and avoid speech’ That line is full of desolation, regret, grief, bleakness and uncertainty. The line speaks of others struggling against impossible odds but still struggling! You sense that struggle in Shute’s story. You also find characters well drawn, with real emotions, and in a way big hearts that you can really get close to. Oddly enough the story is not, in the end, really depressing.

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