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Ratings and Book Reviews ()

Overall rating

4.2 out of 5
5 Stars
94 reviews have 5 stars
4 Stars
86 reviews have 4 stars
3 Stars
37 reviews have 3 stars
2 Stars
5 reviews have 2 stars
1 Star
1 reviews have 1 stars

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All Book Reviews

  • Worth reading

    I don't know how to review this book. It's without a doubt well-written, which has the downside of making many of the characters unbearable. That, at least to me, seemed to be the intention with many of them. There were moments that some of the characters frustrated me so much I had to put the book down for a while. It seems to be something of an inkblot test book; in reading other reviews, the way people interpreted the intention of the book and the morality of the characters differed immensely. Yet to me, the intention seems clear and simple. At any rate, it's a good book, and definitely worth reading.

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    5 person found this review helpful

    5 people found this review helpful

    5 of 8 people found this review helpful

  • Easy enjoyable read

    This NY Times and Sunday Times Bestseller tells the story of Emira, a babysitter in her 20s, and her employer Alix, a social media entrepreneur. It explores the relationship between a privileged woman and the babysitter she employs, each trying to figure out who they are and where they fit in the world. The story starts with Emira being accused of kidnapping 2 year old Briar, on a late night supermarket trip, by a security guard. This shakes the relationship between Emira and Alix, and for the rest of the book Alix is obsessed with becoming friends with, and even family with, her employee. "Such A Fun Age" is character and plot driven, and quick paced despite touching on heavy themes including motherhood, friendship, class, wealth, race, interracial dating, career anxiety, job security, transactional relationships, and the narratives people construct for themselves. The theme that is really prominent though is the tension between supporting versus fetishising people of colour. Two white characters both assume they know best for Emira and both speak to and about her with a sense of ownership. With good intentions, they disempower her. In that way, this novel is both social commentary and satire.

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    1 person found this review helpful

    1 people found this review helpful

    1 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • Superb

    Brilliantly written. Its a deft critique of modern culture.

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    0 person found this review helpful

    0 people found this review helpful

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful

  • Thought provoking

    A very different American story with the colour of one’s skin the most important part of the story.

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    0 person found this review helpful

    0 people found this review helpful

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful

  • A modern comedy of manners

    two sets of experiences collide in this subtle eamination of race & class in philadelphia. Every character has a distnctive voice. I particularly liked the portrayal of Briar, the little girl whom Emira looks after. A funny & moving narrative.

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    0 person found this review helpful

    0 people found this review helpful

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful

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