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Ratings and Book Reviews ()

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3.7 out of 5
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  • Reading should be a pleasure

    Not something I would recommend... in the abstract I could imagine most of the story but there wasn’t enough to take me past chapter four... I have read hundreds of novels and this is one of the few I could :put down:

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  • "Talk to the Animals" has never been so depressing

    I found this book profoundly depressing. None of the human characters in this dystopia seem capable of any degree of love or compassion, except for the narrator's granddaughter, and the only 'humanity' was to be found in some of the animals. The narrator is a middle-aged alcoholic just holding down a job as a guide in an animal park. She has had a more-or-less friendly relationship with a dingo at the park, when a mysterious plague sweeps the country, causing a complete breakdown in society. This illness results in all humans who catch it being not just able, but forced to hear the thoughts of all other animals, including insects - although the latter only become a problem later in the course of the disease. The narrator seems to be the only human who doesn't either consider this evil or become mindlessly - and often suicidally - enthralled. In the end, when the narrator is wandering on foot with a gangrenous hand which will surely kill her - and should already have halfway through the book, her only friend remains the dingo, and that too is taken away, leaving her lost, starving and diseased. I hope Ms McKay was not as depressed writing this as I was reading it!

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