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Ratings and Book Reviews ()

Overall rating

3.7 out of 5
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  • Pretty good, but not as good as the Nigeria novel.

    See above. Maybe some readers can follow it but I had a lot of trouble.

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  • Good, but not as expected

    “What the world needs is bolder sheep” This was not quite what I was expecting. I guess I imagined more of a hunt, worldwide travel, and exploration for the items. While those things happened almost all of them where portrayed as stories told from the past. We don’t go on a true journey with any of the leading characters. Although many of them are in diverse locations; we spend the longest in Christchurch in the before and after the devastating earthquake. We see our characters as they are in a current moment, near the end, if you will, of what seems to be an elaborate and perhaps random treasure hunt. Literary Style For anyone familiar with Wil Ferguson’s past works (including 419 which won the Scotiabank Giller Prize from Canada) they won’t be surprised to learn that it’s very literary. I had to look up a handful of words, reread some passages, and certainly couldn’t read this while a bit tired. This is a book that requires some effort to read and get the true experience from. Depending on if you enjoy this style or not will likely dictate your love for The Finder. Author’s Note I kind of wish I had read the Authors Note at the back of the book. I always waffle on this, especially with stories I know have true elements. Do I want to experience the story with no prejudice or do I want to know what to watch out for? In this case I’ll give you a hint towards reading the authors note. If you want to know about the list objects themselves, look for hidden Alfred Hitchcock references, or look up history on places or the items as you read then definitely flip to the back and read Ferguson’s notes. On Lost Objects The idea of a treasure hunt absolutely intrigues me. Maybe I watched Indiana Jones too many times as a kid; but my first career choice at the age of ten was to be a journalist in the midst of the action. At the time Desert Storm was everywhere and I imagined myself as a daring woman climbing through dust and rubble to get the real stories. Boy was I wrong. Today I’m a anxiety medicated computer programmer who loves to be in new places but hates the process of actually getting to them. So maybe that’s why I really wanted more of a worldwide hunt; because my brain loves to feel like I’m travelling from the comfort of my home. So if you’re hoping to have big reveals or Da Vinci Code like cryptics to solve for the lost items you will be sorely mistaken. That said, all of the items lost (except for one obvious one that is significant to our lead character) are real. And so you can discover more about them on the internet and in the wonderful list of recommended books Ferguson gives in his author’s note. Overall The Finder is the kind of book I’ll talk about to people and recommend (with a caveat about its literary style), likely muse about rereading it for years, but never actually get to it. But I’m happy to put my trade copy on my shelf. Not only because Ferguson is a fellow Canadian and Calgarian (where I’m born and raised, having never left up to today) so I want to support local, but also because it’s truly a worthwhile read even though I hesitate and chose not to give it 5 stars. If you enjoyed Ferguson’s 419 you will be sure to enjoy this. If you like Margaret Atwood (not just Handmaiden’s Tale), Miriam Toews, or Michael Ondaatje then I am very confident you will enjoy this beautifully written story with a cast of varied characters whom (of course) all connect together in the end.

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  • Not very interesting

    It started off interesting enough but got lost with the shadow figure floating through it

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