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Ratings and Book Reviews (3 13 star ratings
3 reviews
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4.2 out of 5
13
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    An excellent story, told very well

    I received a free electronic copy of this novel from Netgalley, Toni Jordan, and Text Publishing. Thank you all for sharing your hard work with me. I have read The Fragments of my own volition, and this review reflects my honest opinion of this work. I am thrilled to recommend this work to friends and family. 'The Fragments' is a taut, intricate tale told very well. We have Allentown, PA from 1928 through 1938 told in the first-person voice of this young student, then silk-weaver Rachel Lehrer, a woman who understands male dominance and abuse from a tender age. We travel with her in 1939 to New York City. We see this glorious city through Rachel's eyes, always something newly built, something cutting edge, books and movies and film stars - and the slow slide to the financial crash, European rumbles of impending war, life on the fast track, faltering. Then Rachel meets Inga Karlson, author of an inspirational and widely acclaimed Pulitzer prize-winning first novel, 'All Has an End' with the second novel in its middle stages and the general public waiting impatiently for book two. Until the fire. All the copies of the second novel, 'The Days, the Minutes', along with the only two people who had read the novel, publisher Charles Cleborn, and author Inga, are burned in a warehouse arson fire. Left are half-burned fragments of several assorted pages of type, a melted glass necklace, and memorabilia and correspondence between Inga and Charles found in their offices. Then we have Brisbane, Queensland, 1986. Cadence "Caddie" Walker was named by her gentle father after the main character in 'All Has an End'. She inherits a bit of her father's obsession with Inga Karlson. Caddie is a bookseller in a local private book store and takes an afternoon off to attend a traveling display of memorabilia from the life of Inga Karlson including those fragments, funeral photos, obituaries, letters, and correspondence from people all over the world to Inga, both after her death and still today. There Caddie meets an older lady who laughingly quotes from the second book - including a line that was not present on the fragment of paper in the display. Caddie was feed Inga from birth - her father read her passages from 'All Has an End' at bedtime and often quoted her work in the everyday life they shared. She knew Inga's work intimately. The concluding line fit too well to be random. But no one else has ever read 'The Days, The Minutes'. Or had they? In trying to solve the puzzle of 'The Days, The Minutes', Caddie is torn between an old love and a new possibility. How can she be sure she is making the right choice? And what happened to Inga's secretary, Rachel?
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    A weak mystery

    The Fragments is an interesting book, slightly Da Vinci Code in style about a sequel to a best selling book which was destroyed when the author died in a warehouse fire. Caddie sets off on a quest to solve the mystery of what happened all those years ago and if a copy of the book has actually survived. The book bounces between present day perspective of Caddie and the past of Rachel – a lady shrouded in mystery as to her identity and relationship to the case. On one hand I really like the split perspective and thought they were well balanced. I did however find the plot slow to start and to be honest, looking back on the story nothing really happens throughout. I found Caddie’s character to be annoying – her obsession over Philip and the choices she makes for him just made her seem unrelatable and I lost respect for her quickly. There are also some really weak links in the story – the beginning of the story seemed like such a throwaway, I don’t believe Caddie would have spent so much time researching something from just a line that sounds like it could have been from a book she’d never read. There are also some cliché moments where a side character just says something random with no relevance to the case that magically solves a clue. Overall The Fragments is a pretty weak mystery – you would think an author with time would be able to craft a really well written and intriguing plot with clues that fit together rather than tangible links that don’t really make sense. Thank you to NetGalley & Text Publishing Company for a chance to read the ARC in exchange for an honest review.
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    The lost book

    The Fragments by Toni Jordan is a literary mystery that alternates between 1930s New York City and 1980s Brisbane, Australia. The back and forth succeeds in retaining the interest and attention of the reader. In the 1930s, Inga Karlson wrote a much-loved bestselling book. The public was enthralled and anxiously awaited the next novel. However, tragedy struck which led to the partial destruction of all copies of the new book, leaving only scorched fragments. In 1980s Brisbane, Caddie Walker, a bookstore clerk, attends an exhibition of the Inga Karlson book fragments. Something that happens there causes Caddie to investigate the occurences of the 1930s to get to the bottom of what led to the loss of such an important book. What follows will not disappoint. This is a quiet thriller that surprises and entertains the reader. Highly recommended. Thank you to Text Publishing Company and NetGalley for the e- ARC in exchange for an honest review.
13

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