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Ratings and Book Reviews ()

Overall rating

4.1 out of 5
5 Stars
43 reviews have 5 stars
4 Stars
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All Book Reviews

  • No twists, but corkscrews! Awesome plot!

    Ruby was once a child war evacuee she meets Stevie! They meet again in their teens and become sweethearts during the WWII bombing of England! However, Ruby never gives up her virginity! Then Stevie is called up for Foreign Service and expects to marry when he returns even though he never formally asked. He returns, but he is different and he is dating wild women and stops seeing her and gets a lady pregnant! Years later Stevie has a stroke as a old man. He starts to try and convey to his daughter something about the picture in his wallet. It’s a picture of Ruby in her 20’s way after his father married his mother. What is it about this picture is dad is trying to make her understand? What is the point? There is a secret, The lady hasn’t been seen or she hasn’t talked to family for years? What does her dad know about this? Did he have something to do with it? The author does a superb job in putting in twists and turns that keep you going from one scenario to a next guess! I loved the character development and the storyline! I definitely would recommend this book! I received an advanced copy from NetGalley and these are my willingly given thoughts and opinions.

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  • Historical fiction at its best

    The Girl Without A Name is book that I will think of often. Historical fiction top of the class! Suzanne Goldring tells the story of Ruby and Stevie and London in the War. The book starts with a devastating flood and no one can figure out why Dick is so devastated that his health is forever changed. The story starts in 2004 and then goes back to when Ruby, Stevie, his sister Joan are all evacuated to Devon along with many children to keep them safe from the bombings. I laughed, I cried, I cheered, I loved some characters, others not so much. You cant help but fall in love with Ruby who really has nothing as she is returned to wartime London. Suzanne Goldring never lets you down with her story telling. This book is a don't miss and should go near the top of your TBR pile. Heartwarming and heartbreaking all at the same time!

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  • Good story with a twist

    I love this cover! I thought the story was good, Stevie was kind of a jerk. It was so sad towards the end and I was so surprised by the twist at the end. I enjoyed the story and definitely recommend! Thanks to Netgalley and the publisher for the early copy

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  • The Girl Without a Name

    The Girl Without A Name (Suzanne Goldring) starts in 2004 and then goes back to 1939, with some back and forth after that. This story is sweet and sad, it has some romance and some history. Reading The Girl Without A Name at times filled my heart with joy and others I would have liked to be able to smack someone across the head to knock some sense into them! I want to thank NetGalley and Bookouture for an early copy to review.

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  • Historical Fiction WW II Child Evacuees

    August 2004. Dick Stevens is found slumped in his lounge chair by his daughter Billie, he can’t speak, he’s desperately trying to tell her something and Billie can’t understand him. He’s had a stroke and taken by ambulance to hospital, once her dad’s stable Billie gathers his things and she notices he has an old crumpled photo in his wallet. Billie is Dick’s eldest daughter, she knows the young lady in the photo isn’t her mum and who is the mystery woman? September 1939. The children from Christchurch school are being evacuated to the country, Ruby Morrison is on the train with Joan and Stevie Sevens, the children are at first rather excited going on a trip and then they start to feel very anxious and nervous. They haven’t been to Devon before, Joan and Ruby stay together with a lovely older lady and poor Stevie isn’t as lucky. The Girl Without A Name has a dual timeline it flows well between 2004, 1939 and into the early 1950’s in England. Billie is determined to discover father’s connection to the young woman in the photo, is she his friend Ruby and did they have a relationship before he married her mum? Stevie had a terrible experience as an evacuee, he returned home to London, here he worked as a teenage messenger during the bombing raids and when he turned 21 he was sent to Palestine to do his national service. I haven’t read a lot about how people coped with what happened to them as children during WW II, it must have had a huge impact on the rest of their lives; by reading the book it makes you very aware of how a series of traumatic experiences can change a child, especially their behavior and morals! The Girl Without A Name, is a story with a very different perspective or insight into children evacuees experiences during WW II, what damage it did to a child’s soul and it’s so sad it happened to a whole generation of English children. The plot had so many twist and turns and the ending took me totally by surprise, I received a copy of this book in exchange for an honest review and five stars from me.

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