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  • Historical Fiction Australian

    1873, after a very long journey from England Eliza Penrose arrives in the gold mining town of Maiden's Creek in Australia it’s been five years since she last saw her brother William and she’s excited to see him. When she arrives at her uncle’s Charles Cowper house she’s receives some very bad news about Will and she’s in total shock. Alec McLeod left Scotland to escape the memories of losing his wife and baby in childbirth. The eligible ladies of Maiden's Creek have been fluttering their eyelashes at him for years; he finds some solace in the bottom of a whiskey bottle, he lives with his single brother Ian and he never wants to get married again. He and Eliza meet on the day she arrives in town, not the best of starts, but the Scotsman finds Eliza rather bonny and tries his best to ignore how attractive she is. Alec works at the Maiden’s Creek mine as an engineer, he’s concerned at the way it’s being run by Eliza’s uncle and he thinks Charles is up to no good. Eliza and Alec can’t ignore obvious errors in the gold mines account books, they have concerns over the mines safety and they put themselves in danger to find out what really happened to Eliza’s brother. Eliza has a kind heart and a strong spirit and she and Alec make the perfect couple. I enjoyed reading about her being the teacher at the local school and her kindness to one of her students called Charlotte. The story had aspects of mystery, suspense, danger we have all heard of gold fever, it makes people greedy and break the law. I enjoyed reading The Goldminer’s Sister and I gave it four stars.

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  • Good

    Easy to read interesting story with a history of the area and goldmines in the 1800s highlighted.

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  • A suspenseful, romantic story!

    What always sticks in my mind long after I've read one of Alison Stuart's beautifully researched, suspense-filled historical romances are the images. It's an immersive experience where you get the depth of a book yet feel you've also watched it as a film. Top marks, once again, for The Goldminer's Sister. It's a great sequel to The Postmistress which I read some time ago. I really like the fact that The Goldminer's Sister works so well as a stand-alone novel with mention of characters who'd appeared in the previous book appearing to me like old friends, but not in any way that felt either that it would have been necessary to have read the previous book or that information about them was repetitive for those who have read the book. I put this down to Alison's deft touch at layering her novels with just the right amount of everything needed so that from the moment you open The Goldminer's Sister you just want to binge on it until you reluctantly reach the end. This book has it all: a very clever plot that is well supported (and therefore thoroughly compelling) due to the depth of research (I never imagined I'd learn so much about what life was really like in a gold mining town in the 1870s); great characters who are sympathetic yet flawed enough to be just the way I like them PLUS the necessary villains. Yes, there are more than one and that's what makes it such a great Whodunnit, too. The Gold Miner's Sister kept me guessing right until the end - and the redemption and redress aspects were very satisfying. So yes! I really recommend this to all historical fiction readers who like to be challenged by an intriguing mystery given great depth by wonderful, three-dimensional characters - overlaid by a truly wonderful romance.

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  • Love this period of history

    This time of gold mining is such an interesting period in Australian history then add the human factors and you have a great story

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