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Ratings and Reviews (8 20 star ratings
8 reviews
)

Overall rating

4.6 out of 5
20
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  • 1 person found this review helpful

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    Beautifully written

    So beautifully written and such an uplifting and moving story of a big part of our history. I’m recommending this book to everyone!
  • 1 person found this review helpful

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    Excellent read

    My family started our new life in Bonegilla migrant camp in July 1960 I had tears in my eyes by the time I completed page 4 so for me it was truely a memorable read . Times change we change ,but the circle of life just goes on.
  • 1 person found this review helpful

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    An insightful look at our migrant history

    The Last of the Bonegilla Girls is another new direction for Purman and it’s one she navigated with finesse and style, it is a work of fiction inspired by her own family heritage and knowing that going in kept me thinking throughout. I want to call this an historical fiction but I don’t think it is quite long ago enough to fit that category. It is certainly an insightful and interesting look at a different era in Australian history, and one that is fascinating. I have read and loved Purman’s work since her debut and I think I have read everything she’s released (except one of the novellas which I am still getting to, I think I did buy it in the end but I just haven’t got there yet). The Last of the Bonegilla Girls is no exception though it did strike me that the setting was very different to the rest of her print novels in that it isn’t set on the South Australian coastline, instead it is set in the Bonegilla migrant camp in rural Victoria. I think The Last of the Bonegilla Girls is quite a timely release because there are many people coming to Australia for a fresh start and they aren’t always being welcomed. The Last of the Bonegilla Girls reminds us that this isn’t the first time Australia has welcomed other cultures to build a new life here, and that a large percentage of Australians have migrant histories. It is also a study in taking the correct channels to start a new life here. The Last of the Bonegilla Girls brings together four girls from very different backgrounds into a friendship that will last a lifetime. It spans decades, generations and a wealth of emotions. Purman has created complex and courageous characters that you can’t help but empathise with. The story focuses on the teenaged daughters embarking on new lives but it also explores their parents and siblings.
  • 0 person found this review helpful

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    A lovely read.

    Lovely story, really enjoyed this book. I liked how we were drawn into each girls life. Victoria Pullman included details about each decade that were evocative of the era, such as the browns and oranges of the seventies. Thoroughly enjoyed it as my holiday read.
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    Well worth reading

    I very much enjoyed this book and could relate to a lot that has been written. I grew up in Woodville so knew a lot of the places that were mentioned in the book. I remember when I was in school how unfairly a lot of these people were treated and how wrong it was.
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