Skip to main content

More titles to consider

Shopping Cart

You're getting the VIP treatment!

Item(s) unavailable for purchase
Please review your cart. You can remove the unavailable item(s) now or we'll automatically remove it at Checkout.
itemsitem
itemsitem

Ratings and Book Reviews ()

Overall rating

4.6 out of 5
5 Stars
17 reviews have 5 stars
4 Stars
7 reviews have 4 stars
3 Stars
0 reviews have 3 stars
2 Stars
0 reviews have 2 stars
1 Star
1 reviews have 1 stars

Share your thoughts

You've already shared your review for this item. Thanks!

We are currently reviewing your submission. Thanks!

Complete your review

All Book Reviews

  • Numbers, Codes & Romance

    'The numbers marched across the page in a glory all their own.' Margot De Wilde has a mind that most of us can't really comprehend and it is amazing to see how she can analyze and solve mathematical problems. Knowing that she has been blessed with such mathematical genius prompts Margot to volunteer to help break the codes that are being used in German telegrams during WWI and she spends long hours in a secret room, Room 40. The Number of Love features spies, biological warfare and danger that lurks everywhere but there is also romance and Margot's eventual understanding that she needs to learn to wholly and completely trust God. Margot has never felt a need for love, marriage, or children and even though she believes in God, she finds herself often wondering just what God's Plan truly is as this dreadful war continues. Drake Elton finds himself falling in love with 'the nameless young girl with the impossibly dark eyes' and he shows creativity and patience in his plan to win Margot's heart. A question is asked concerning how long two people should wait when they know that God has put them together for a reason and Drake simply replies "As long as it takes." And, still later, in a letter, he tells Margot "I want forever with you. I will wait a year, a decade, a century to make you my wife." White certainly knows how to write words that made me swoon! She also knows how to write about faith and family; reading Margot's ability to finally trust completely is very heartwarming. The doubts that she once had are replaced with the knowledge that God can be trusted 'not just with her well-being, but with her dreams.' Author Roseanna M. White has a knack for combining fiction with historical facts and she has succeeded in making The Number of Love another must-read for lovers of Christian historical fiction! It is very apparent that she devoted a great deal of time and effort in researching for this book and it is a fantastic way to begin a new series. I am looking forward to the next book in The Codebreakers series. I received a copy of this book from the author/publisher and all opinions in this review are my own.

    Thanks for your feedback!

    0 person found this review helpful

    0 people found this review helpful

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful

  • A Life of Codes

    During the Great War, there was a place in London so secret that even today not everything is known about it. Referred to as Room 40, it was a beehive of activity that contained top code breakers and puzzle masters. They worked around the clock pouring over the enemy’s coded top-secret information in an attempt to decipher the messages. The knowledge they gleamed helped protect their country, along with her military and intelligence agents. Margot De Wilde, is a beautiful and brilliant, no-nonsense young female who is unaware of most people--because she looks at the world through the filter of numbers. But what really makes her unusual is that she is one of the rare females who works in Room 40. Her work brings her into contact with undercover agent Drake Elton. Unknowingly, she also becomes involved with a dangerous enemy assassin. Margot finds herself in the middle of a plot to kidnap her best friend, kill Drake, and bomb London. This action story contains secret missions, clandestine meetings, along with a romance that just might turn out to be one-sided. However, there were a couple of places the tale slowed down. I loved that Margot’s strong faith in God was part of the story, and that I learned things about WWI I didn’t know. This is the first installment in The Codebreakers Series. Anyone who enjoys well-written intrigue or romance stories will like this 4-star book. Bethany House Publishing has provided bookreadingtic with a review book.

    Thanks for your feedback!

    0 person found this review helpful

    0 people found this review helpful

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful

  • Yay! Shadows Over England' Theme/Characters Return

    London 1917, WWI Margot De Wilde has returned to us as a key player in this story featuring Room 40 and the life of Codebreakers whose sole job is to decode war messages in various forms day in and day out. She has always seen life through numbers. The Lord speaks to her in numbers. She calculates every step and motion with the utmost effectiveness. At 17, she is generally the most intelligent person in a room. However, her intelligence and calculations leave little room for emotion. Drake Elton is an undercover agent and a very good one. His younger sister Dot struggles through life and he needs to see her settled with a job before he heads out on his next assignment. In doing so, he meets a girl with “impossibly dark eyes” who challenges his thoughts. But, he has little time to delve into that while a war is raging and answers need uncovering. Das Gespenst proves to be a mysterious villain and adds the necessary element of danger. His character was interesting while trying to discover his “angle”. He also brought a GO board with him, another attention-grabbing throw-back to the previous series. The story is continually moving forward at a great pace as the players in the war, on both sides, do their parts. Reading about anthrax and the effort to uncover code books from U-boats, Zeppelins and Gotha bombers were very interesting. Tea Quotes: “Here you go.” Cheerful and smiling and utterly oblivious, she handed him a cup of steaming, fragrant tea. “Just the way you like.” “And after another night shift, she was more than looking forward to a hot cup of tea, her clanking radiator, and maybe a not-warm-enough bath before she went to bed.” Spiritual Moment: “Do not neglect your prayers, Drake. Neglect your chores, neglect your ablutions, neglect your mother, but never neglect our prayers. They are what root you to the Lord.” Wonderfully written as always. While we do get to visit old friends, you do NOT need to have read the previous series as plenty of backstory is scattered within this book. I would also add, that while the time frame is WWI, you are not dragged through the gruesomeness of war. I very much appreciated that. I am looking forward to Phillip Camden’s future story. It is my privilege to share my opinion without expectation or compensation. I received an advance copy without charge from BETHANY HOUSE PUBL. SERIES: The Codebreakers The Number of Love – Book 1 June 4, 2019 Wings of Devotion – Book 2 tba

    Thanks for your feedback!

    0 person found this review helpful

    0 people found this review helpful

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful

  • Wonderful historical fiction

    The Number of Love by Roseanna M. White is a fantastic historical fiction book. Having read several of this author’s books before I was excited to read this one and was not disappointed in the least. It is a beautiful, captivating story of love, loss, friendships, and faith. With an expert pen and graceful characterization, the author ushers readers into London’s codebreaking room during WWI where they are quickly pulled into the lives of Margot, Dot, and Drake, vibrant characters that each have poignant backgrounds and with which readers will easily connect. Drake, of the broken nose and insightful questions; Margot, driven by ratios, rates & angles—an education her dream not a brood of children; Dot, fearful of life outside her apartment and yet a fearsome friend to have; and a ghost of an enemy who is out for revenge. I loved how the author skillfully wove their lives together into a compelling read with the intrigue and dangers of war, the friendships that are formed in difficult circumstances, and of course, the romance…ahh, the romance. Interest is kept high with lots of action in a number of settings—a fearsome gunfight on a train in Spain, a frightening mugging on London streets, and a furtive midnight flight into France. This multifaceted story kept me turning the pages wondering if Dot was really the only connection between Drake and Margot? Would Dot and Margot still be friends since Dot was set on marriage and Margot on academia? What is this game of Go in the park? Why is Jaeger out to kill Drake? So many unexpected twists and reveals in the story. The Number of Love is a book fans of historical fiction will not want to miss. It is not only a story of friendships and love in wartime but a story where individuals learn that their faith in God is valid and that He can be trusted even with their dreams, and that He gives guidance and direction in dangerous times—sometimes even in the form of numbers. I received a complimentary copy of the book from the publisher and was not required to write a review. The opinions are my own.

    Thanks for your feedback!

    0 person found this review helpful

    0 people found this review helpful

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful

  • 3 Reasons You Should Read The Number of Love

    I think I love spy novels even more than frontier stories. I don't know if it's the secret codes or the chance to become someone you're not. The way people who aren't quite normal in regular life find meaning and purpose. At least a little bit of it is the way the work that is done in secret can save lives, stop wars before they start, or reduce the casualty count. Maybe it's because there are spies in the Bible. But if spy novels are just plain awesome, historical spy novels are the next level. My favorites are World War I, World War II, Cold War stories. Today's technology makes for some great gadgets, but I love the human element and the old school, hands-on ways of doing things. So take my love for historical fiction, all things intelligence, and the last Roseanna M. White book I read, and you can bet I was eagerly anticipating The Number of Love. A Great WWI Story Ms. White tells a great story, long enough for my taste too! She'll make you fall in love with the world of WWI codebreakers, and with a young lady who thinks and feels in the land of numbers. This gal is really, really smart! You'll feel a sense of good vs. evil and a sense of purpose - even a hunger to find purpose in what you do every day. And you may find yourself thinking about the "bad guy" through different eyes too. I am really looking forward to reading more of The Codebreakers series! This Girl is a True Believer I was so glad to get to know a cast of characters with a Catholic background. See, while I'm not Catholic, and I'm not always on the same page theologically with my Catholic brothers and sisters, we serve the same Christ. In Protestant circles, Catholics have a reputation for being more ritualistic than religious, but I think you'll find the same thing to some degree in any tradition. In every group of Christians, you'll find "nominal" believers (I call them "cultural Christians") and true believers. The Catholics in this story, like so many, are true believers, and their journey of faith so closely resembles mine. Enemy or Opponent? I loved how our heroine, Margot, sees the enemy. When her home was occupied in Belgium by the Germans years before, she learned "that a uniform didn't make a man by nature a friend or an enemy. But choice did." Even as she faithfully serves as a codebreaker in the secret Room 40, her desire is not to see the enemy destroyed but the enemy stopped. At the end of the day, at the end of the battle, at the end of the war, the guy in the other uniform is a son, a brother, a father, a husband, a patriot. Margot's love for her enemy comes out in a beautiful way at the end of the story. "Das Gespenst," one of the German spies in The Number of Love, thinks of Margot not as an enemy, but an opponent. The difference is honor. Respect. And a different desire, because when you defeat your opponent, you can shake hands and move on to the next match. When you defeat an enemy, the enemy is destroyed. Margot's war, "The Great War" as it was called, seems a lot more cut-and-dry than some of our wars today. Today the battle lines seem more blurry. How much more important, then, is Margot's perspective? On the other side of the battle, no matter how important, is another human, another life created in God's image. It doesn't mean we shouldn't fight. There are times to stand and fight, to come between evil and the innocent and say "it stops here." But we fight with God's heart for those who oppose us. We grieve when there is loss, because God grieves. Maybe, too, we can fight in the way of honor. A way that honors God, that honors those who have gone before us, and yes, even our opponents. The Number of Love reminds us that in whatever fight, be it on the battlefield, the courtroom, or even with your coworker or neighbor or your teenager, we can remember that Satan, not the human in front of us, is the real enemy. 43 “You have heard that it was said, You must love your neighbor[a] and hate your enemy. 44 But I say to you, love your enemies and pray for those who harass you45 so that you will be acting as children of your Father who is in heaven. He makes the sun rise on both the evil and the good and sends rain on both the righteous and the unrighteous. 46 If you love only those who love you, what reward do you have? Don’t even the tax collectors do the same? 47 And if you greet only your brothers and sisters, what more are you doing? Don’t even the Gentiles do the same? 48 Therefore, just as your heavenly Father is complete in showing love to everyone, so also you must be complete. - Matthew 5:43-48 CEB I received a review copy of this book; all opinions are my own.

    Thanks for your feedback!

    0 person found this review helpful

    0 people found this review helpful

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful

You can read this item using any of the following Kobo apps and devices:

  • DESKTOP
  • eREADERS
  • IOS
  • ANDROID
  • TABLETS