Skip to main content

More titles to consider

Loading...

Shopping Cart

You're getting the VIP treatment!

Item(s) unavailable for purchase
Please review your cart. You can remove the unavailable item(s) now or we'll automatically remove it at Checkout.
itemsitem
itemsitem

Ratings and Book Reviews ()

Overall rating

4.2 out of 5
5 Stars
21 reviews have 5 stars
4 Stars
10 reviews have 4 stars
3 Stars
11 reviews have 3 stars
2 Stars
0 reviews have 2 stars
1 Star
1 reviews have 1 stars

Share your thoughts

You've already shared your review for this item. Thanks!

We are currently reviewing your submission. Thanks!

Complete your review

All Book Reviews

  • Entertaining dose of British crime fiction

    “‘Of course, plot is overrated,’ says Lance. ‘I try to get beyond describing what happens next.’ Edwin reminds himself never to read Lance’s book.” The Post Script Murders is the second book by British author, Elly Griffiths, to feature DS Harbinder Kaur. When Natalka Kolisnyk finds one of her elderly clients dead in her home, she quickly begins to suspect that Peggy Smith, a fit and lively ninety-year-old, did not die of natural causes. Peggy’s near neighbour in Seaview Court, Edwin Fitzgerald agrees, and their beachside barista at The Shack, Benedict Cole, doesn’t take long to convince: both men recall Peggy’s mention of feeling she was being watched. At Nigel Smith’s direction, Natalka begins packing up his mother’s books, and notes most have either a dedication: “To Peggy, Without whom…”; or mention her in their acknowledgements: “Thanks for the murders.” But the uncorrected proof that Edwin takes as a memento, Dex Challoner’s new book, has a postcard slipped between the pages “We are coming for you”. Sounds ominous… Natalka takes her suspicion to DS Harbinder Kaur, who is willing to consider her concerns, moreso when a masked individual takes a book from Peggy’s flat at gunpoint. But she’s less than impressed when, after a popular author is murdered, this amateur detective trio treks to Aberdeen to warn other potential victims at a writers’ festival. Are they dealing with Ukrainian assassins? Polish spies? Plagiarising writers? Thieving descendants? As well as her gay detective of south Asian extraction, and several crime writers, Griffiths populates this novel with a cast of quirky characters: a Ukrainian carer with cryptocurrency expertise, an ancient TV producer and an ex-monk-turned-coffee-shop-owner, all determined to solve the murder of the woman described as having “the soul of a killer hidden in the body of a sweet old lady.” Oh, and a few more murders that occur along the way. As always, Griffiths captures her settings with ease, manages to insert plenty of black humour, and her plot is clever: there are red herrings and not a few surprises, and even the most astute reader is likely to be kept guessing until the final chapters. This is another entertaining dose of British crime fiction and more of Harbinder Kaur will definitely be welcome. This unbiased review is from an uncorrected proof copy provided by NetGalley and the publishers.

    Thanks for your feedback!

    0 person found this review helpful

    0 people found this review helpful

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful

  • A well written cosy mystery

    Definitely a Cosy Mystery. A well written, easy to read, mystery that involves a cast of characters, all of whom are fascinating and real. Peggy Smith is a pensioner, living in a lovely flat overlooking the sea. She's a fan of murder mysteries and spends her time either helping a local best selling author, or, making a note of things she sees from her window. Then, she is found dead. Was it natural causes, or, murder? What follows is an intriguing tale of a small group of Peggy's friends who start to investigate her death, supported by a local DS, Harbinder Kaur. I've not read the first book that Harbinder Kaur features and this didn't impact my enjoyment as this is a solid stand alone. If you enjoy an easy to read, entertaining, murder mystery with excellent characters and a solid storyline, this is for you.

    Thanks for your feedback!

    0 person found this review helpful

    0 people found this review helpful

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful

  • Superb!

    This is my second foray into the works of Elly Griffiths, my first being a book from her Ruth Galloway series. This book, The Postscript Murders is the second instalment in the Harbinder Kaur series, and I found that jumping in at book two did not prevent me from enjoying the story immensely. It is a wonderfully woven crime mystery set in a coastal location in West Sussex, England. From the opening pages, the action never let up and the story unfolded like an uncoiled spring. In this instalment featuring DS Harbinder Kaur and Ukrainian care worker, Natalka Kolsnyk, 90-year-old Peggy Smith is found dead in her chair by the window, and it seems she died of natural causes... but did she? Natalka, a worker for Care4You, noticed an unusual number of crime novels whilst clearing out Peggy’s flat that were all dedicated to Peggy and each one included a mysterious postscript. When other events occur, DS Kaur begins to think that there could be no such thing as an unsuspicious death. This story kept me guessing as to whom was responsible for the murder and their actual motives. Yet, for me, the main strengths in this police procedural were Elly Griffiths' wonderful bunch of characters. The Postscript Murders was a neatly plotted and elegantly told mystery and I have been inspired to read the first book in the series, The Stranger Diaries. I am also looking forward to seeing where Elly Griffiths takes Harbinger next. I received a complimentary copy of this novel from Quercus via NetGalley at my request, and this review is my own unbiased opinion.

    Thanks for your feedback!

    0 person found this review helpful

    0 people found this review helpful

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful

  • Easy reading

    A easy readable murder and mystery with a little twist at the end

    Thanks for your feedback!

    0 person found this review helpful

    0 people found this review helpful

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful

  • A great read with many homages to the "golden age"

    As a devotee of her Dr. Ruth Galloway series, I thoroughly enjoyed this second instalment in Elly Griffiths' D.S. Harbinder Kaur series. As in its series predecessor, The Stranger Diaries, Harbinder features as one of an ensemble cast of characters, with a major part of the storyline told from the perspective of non-police characters. We do learn more about Harbinder's personal and professional life in this book though, and she is a delightful, complex and engaging character. The book opens with sprightly 90-year-old Peggy Smith observing and documenting the goings-on outside her Shoreham-by-Sea (southern coast of England) bay window. Later that evening, Peggy is found dead, still sitting in her chair, by her agency carer, Ukrainian-born Natalka Kolisnyk. Natalka isn't satisfied that Peggy's death was natural, despite her advanced age, and contacts local police, speaking to D.S. Harbinder Kaur to report her suspicions. It transpires that Peggy was a "murder consultant", and had assisted numerous successful crime writers by devising ingenious methods of murder, garnering her numerous dedications and acknowledgements. Kaur is initially dubious about Natalka's story, but becomes intrigued as additional unusual details emerge and another suspicious death occurs. From here, the book takes the form of two interconnected storylines, following both Kaur's official police investigation and the activity of Natalka, who teams up with two unlikely confederates to uncover the truth - Benedict Cole, a diffident former monk turned seaside barista and Edwin Fitzgerald, a snappily-dressed octogenarian, who was Peggy's neighbour. Together, and parallel to Kaur's investigation, they probe the details of Peggy's life in and around Shoreham, before setting off on a road trip adventure to the Aberdeen Crime Writers' Festival in Scotland. This is the second book I've read that has used a crime writing festival as a setting (the other being The Royal Baths Murder by J.R. Ellis, which took place at a thinly-veiled facsimile of the Theakston's Old Peculier festival in Harrogate), and I love that both authors have drawn on their own experience as a crime writer at large in depicting the curious mix of excitement, networking opportunities, resentment and one-upmanship that these events entail. The Postscript Murders takes a lighter approach to crime than Elly Griffiths' well-established and excellent Ruth Galloway Series, although in a literary sense it sits above the majority of books in the "cosy mystery" genre. As always with Griffiths, her characters are complex and well-developed over the course of the novel. I particularly loved the quirkiness of the "amateur detective" trio in The Postscript Murders and the relationships that blossomed between them. The plot is enthralling, taking many twists and turns and containing many surprise developments for the reader to savour. The conclusion is fitting and satisfying, tying up many (but not all) loose ends that the story has thrown up. Via the late Peggy's dedication to and encyclopaedic knowledge of the crime genre, Griffiths makes a fitting homage, both to the great writers of the "golden age" and to modern writers pushing the boundaries into new and exciting sub-genres of crime fiction. I'm really looking forward to reading future outings for D.S. Harbinder Kaur. Highly recommended, both to existing readers of Elly Griffiths' Ruth Galloway Series and to those yet to discover her excellent crime-mystery books. My thanks to Elly Griffiths, publisher Houghton Mifflin Harcourt and NetGalley, for the opportunity to read and review this wonderful title.

    Thanks for your feedback!

    0 person found this review helpful

    0 people found this review helpful

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful

You can read this item using any of the following Kobo apps and devices:

  • DESKTOP
  • eREADERS
  • IOS
  • ANDROID
  • TABLETS