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Ratings and Book Reviews ()

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  • Thrones, Dominations

    I am intimately acquainted with all the Wimsey novels and there are some minor factual errors. Talboys was in Hertfordshire, not on the edge of the fens, and the village was Paggleham, not Pagglesham. In Strong Poison I am pretty sure that Harriet herself told Wimsey severely that if anyone ever married him it would be for the pleasure of hearing him talk piffle. There are some instances of too-modern speech eg I am sure no one talked about upping the ante in 1936. I also think that neither Sayers nor Walsh had much real idea of how working class people speak. Rose says 'might of' instead of 'might have' and then a sentence later says 'might have'! 'Might've' would be more accurate. It's only recently that 'might of' has crept into modern English, probably owing to the lack of grammar taught in schools. I also don't think that Juliet Mango would have used a word like 'elicited' , in fact all her letters sound far too educated for her status in life. All that said, I'm being an anorak, and I enjoyed the book. I don't know which bits were Sayers and which Paton Walsh but I could guess. Good clean fun.

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  • A Worthy Follower to Dorothy L Sayers.

    For all fond readers of Dorothy L Sayers it is nice to know that Peter and Harriet lived on. Jill Paton Walsh writes very well in the style of DLS and her plot hangs together well.

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  • Thrones, Dominations

    A great read, it was like renewing acquaintance with old friends.

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  • A Remarkable Achievement

    It is enough to say that I could not tell where Dorothy Sayers left off and Jill Paton Walsh took over.

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  • Glorious follow up to the original series

    I am indebted to the Lord Peter Wimsey Facebook page for alerting me to these books and how very good they are. I understand that this was left unfinished by Dorothy L Sayers and Jill Paton Walsh has done an admirable job of completing the novel. It is not without its issues, at first I found the quoting of poetry and other snippets rather overbearing, a bit too much 'look at me, aren't I intellectual?', I don't know whether that was original prose, which Ms Sayers may have culled or came from Ms Patton Walsh. Anyway, set in 1936, Lord Peter Wimsey and Harriet Vane have just returned from their honeymoon and are settling into their new house in London. Harriet in particular is trying to find her way, learning how to live with servants, having money, not needing to work, coping with the family expectations that she and Peter will immediately produce a son as the 'spare' to the Duke of Denver's son and heir, and of course coping with her domineering sister-in-law Helen. Peter and Harriet are part of London society, dinner parties, theatre performances etc and are introduced to another young couple Rosamund and Laurence Harwell. Although apparently very much in love, the Harwell's marriage seems dysfunctional and Rosamund very dissatisfied with Laurence. Add in a brilliant but egotistical portrait artist, an up-and-coming young actress, and an infatuated playwright and the scene is set for ... murder (sorry, had a flashback to the tv series Hart to Hart there). Once this hit its stride it was so evocative of what I love about the original Lord Peter Wimsey novels and short stories, the view into a world long gone, the way in which Peter and Harriet tentatively map out their new relationship, Bunter and the Denver family. Just a joy to read a new Lord Peter Wimsey book.

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