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Ratings and Reviews (19 162 star ratings
19 reviews
)

Overall rating

4.6 out of 5
162
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  • 2 person found this review helpful

    2 people found this review helpful

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    Do not forget the author of the epilogue

    I’ve just finished the book, and it truly made a great impression on me. If it was to be put on a shelf by topic, it should stand next to Atul Gawande’s Being Mortal. Both books are about dying and care of the loved ones, both written by doctors. But while Gawande focuses on very old people, Kalanithi’s story is about a brilliant young adult in his best years, full of energy and plans for future, struck with terminal disease. More: it is a story of himself. Gawande’s writing is very committed, authenticated by experience of taking care of his own father dying, and very valuable because of reasonable answers, proposals and solutions, and should be read by anyone who is involved in care of the elderly, maybe anyone who has parents alive, obligatory by every doctor. Kalanithi’s book takes your heart, wets your eyes and makes you answer yourself questions what life, love and death means to you. Paul Kalanithi was a kind of polymath, if this term could be used outside technical sciences. Educated in literature, biology, medicine, taking life wholeheartedly but responsibly, finally found his call in very demanding field of neurosurgery. Diagnosed with inoperable cancer still in his thirties, he commenced writing down thoughts about the meaning of his life. Academic background in literature gives fruit in his brilliant writing, extensive yet comprehensible vocabulary, vast comparisons and non-trivial answers. It is definitely a great piece of literature, though from time to time a reader asks himself, if such an ideal, like a marble Greek hero, could have really existed. It was his wife, Lucy, who infused breath and blood into the marble literary figure. Reading her epilogue, I wept like a child. It was him, who was the author of the whole book, but it was her supplement that made it thoroughly human. Definitely, one of the most moving books I’ve read in recent years. (I am a Polish reader, still only learning English, so forgive me any language flaws)
  • 2 person found this review helpful

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    Sincere, serious and a soul fully released

    If you wish to gain a better understanding of death and dying I couldn't think of a better place to start. It might seem like grim tidings but it full of life and uplift. It will endure.
  • 1 person found this review helpful

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    When breathe becomes air

    This book was an insightful read, great for anyone touched by Melanoma. It can be confronting but it is also heart warming.
  • 1 person found this review helpful

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    Such a moving book.

    I cried when I finished this book. Such courage and such a moving story. Fantastic.
  • 1 person found this review helpful

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    Very insightful

    Gives the closest idea as to what it feels like to be at the other end of the table. Something I have not thought deeply about in my years of practice.
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