More titles to consider

Shopping Cart

You're getting the VIP treatment!

Item(s) unavailable for purchase
Please review your cart. You can remove the unavailable item(s) now or we'll automatically remove it at Checkout.
itemsitem
itemsitem
Ratings and Book Reviews (5 13 star ratings
5 reviews
)

Overall rating

3.9 out of 5
13
5 Stars 4 Stars 3 Stars 2 Stars 1 Star
2 9 1 1 0

Share your thoughts

You've already shared your review for this item. Thanks!

We are currently reviewing your submission. Thanks!

Complete your review

All Book Reviews

  • 1 person found this review helpful

    1 people found this review helpful

    1 of 1 people found this review helpful

    Thanks for your feedback!

    A brilliant read!

    I absolutely loved The Rumor and I couldn’t wait to see what Lesley was going to come up with next for her second novel. Who Did You Tell is another brilliant read that had me immediately hooked right from the first page! Full of mystery, suspense and with great twists and turns, Who Did You Tell definitely keeps you on the edge of your seat, gripped until the thrilling conclusion. Lesley has crafted a well thought out and researched story that is compelling and does not shy away from the horrible disease of alcoholism. I have read many books that have this topic as its basis, but it is always from a males perspective. In this case it is a refreshing change to see this from a woman’s perspective for once. At the risk of accidentally giving something away, I think the blurb gives just enough information on what the book is about so I will stop here on discussing the plot. Lesley has done a great job with all the characterisation in this book. For me the standout is Astrid who is very believable, as she struggles on a daily basis to try and stay sober, but can also be seen as the unreliable narrator due to her disease. My heart just went out to her. Having watched someone very close to me struggle with addiction and unfortunately succumbing to it, this book is very personal to me and Lesley handles this topic with compassion and sensitivity. I really enjoy the ease of Lesley’s writing. Everything just flows so seamlessly which makes for a quick and enjoyable read. Even though this is only Lesley’s second novel, she has definitely mastered leading the reader down one path only to do a complete 360 and change the direction entirely, which I really love in a book. I have learnt quickly that there is no becoming complacent when reading a book from Lesley and what may be the obvious path the story is heading down, is not so obvious at all! Hats off to you Lesley for another stellar read. I will be waiting very impatiently and can’t wait to see what you come up with next. It was an absolute pleasure to read and review Who Did You Tell which I highly recommend. Thank-you to NetGalley, Transworld Books and Lesley Kara for allowing me to read an advanced copy of Who Did You Tell which I have reviewed honestly and voluntarily.
  • 0 person found this review helpful

    0 people found this review helpful

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful

    Thanks for your feedback!

    A twisty thriller

    Astrid is a recovering alcoholic, moving back in with her mother to try and start a new and sober life in sleepy Flintstead. However when mysterious notes and photographs start appearing at her door she realises someone must know about her dark past, but who? I really enjoyed Lesley Kara’s debut novel of The Rumour and gave it 5 stars so I was excited to read Who Did You Tell – her second novel. I enjoyed the nod to her first book in that it is set in the same village of Flintstead. It’s very much a separate story but I liked the fact the previous plot was mentioned in passing as being something that had happened a few years ago – it felt a bit meta! I found Astrid to be a really strong and interesting main character. She’s very flawed – an alcoholic desperate to get back on the right track but still very human and at risk of bad decisions and thoughts. You spent a lot of time hoping she wouldn’t make the wrong choice and go back to her own lifestyle which made you feel very invested in her as a character. She also has a hint of an unreliable narrator about her because there are some things about her past she doesn’t quite remember which added to the mystery of the plot. What I enjoyed so much about The Rumour was how many red herrings and twists were in the book that kept me guessing at every turn. I didn’t really feel the plot was as effective here – there were only so many outcomes that could be predicted, only so many suspects to choose from. It wasn’t predictable by any stretch of the imagination but the twist had less of an impact on me than the other book had. I also found a few parts of the story felt a bit too convenient and unrealistic – just there to try and muddy the waters than actually credible plot points. Overall Who Did You Tell is a twisty thriller and a strong follow-up to The Rumour. Thank you to NetGalley, Random House UK and Transworld Publishers – Bantam Press for the chance to read the ARC in exchange for an honest review.
  • 0 person found this review helpful

    0 people found this review helpful

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful

    Thanks for your feedback!

    Psychological thriller

    Astrid formerly known as Hilary is a 32 year old recovering alcoholic, she has now been sober for 192 days, trying to turn her life around. Back living with her mum in a sleepy seaside town, where everyone seems to know everyone’s business. It’s the last place Astrid had thought she would be. With her Quaker mum, who has had to deal with a lot from Astrid, but you know this is her last chance, not just with her mum but maybe with life. Astrid had gone off the rails at 15 which is when she had changed her name believing she would become more ‘visible’. Astrid has many demons she is fighting, some of those demons you aren’t sure whether they are real, or the drink, creating false memories. But as the story moves on you realise some of those worries are genuine. She attends weekly AA meetings where she meets Rosie, who is a volunteer at Oxfam, Astrid doesn’t seem too keen on her, then there’s Helen, who Astrid does befriend but are either of them a good influence, Astrid sees Helen coming out of a shop with bottles of alcohol, should she really be that close to temptation. She is clearly trying to make up for any misdeeds committed whilst under the influence of alcohol. But what is she running from? Who is following her? What did she do when desperate for a drink? What has she done that is so bad? There are lots of twists in the story to keep you engaged. Just as things are starting to look a little brighter, gaining a bit of employment, a possible relationship although she isn’t honest about being an alcoholic, this puts a strain on things when she refuses a drink. Although realistically it shouldn’t matter whether she has alcohol or a soft drink. Messages start arriving in the post, as well as some left in the house. What has she done that someone knows about? Although this book was a bit of a slow starter the pace did pick up. I like the way the author shows the difficulties an alcoholic has, that craving which doesn’t go away, it’s a temptation that will be there for ever, one sip of alcohol can sends you straight back down the slippery slope, the same as any addiction, but it may be harder for alcoholics with so many social drinkers nowadays. This is a debilitating addiction, the effects it has on the drinker, how you behave, the effects on family. Such a tough thing to give up when it has you in its grip. I would like to thank #netgalley and #Randomhousepublishers for an eARC of this book in exchange for an honest, fair and unbiased review.
  • 0 person found this review helpful

    0 people found this review helpful

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful

    Thanks for your feedback!

    Outstanding!

    The bestselling author of The Rumour is back with her new psychological thriller, Who Did You Tell? Having set the bar high with her previous book, Lesley Kara had a lot to live up to... and pulled if off with style in this story of alcohol dependency, secrets, lies, mistakes, blame, lack of trust and guilt. Astrid is a recovering alcoholic and has returned to her hometown of Flinstead, reluctantly moving back in with her mother, and focusing on her recovery. In the quiet seaside town, far away from the temptations and painful memories of her life before, Astrid is hoping to turn things around, but she is also harbouring a secret - one that she believes nobody knows about. In this suspenseful mystery novel, Lesley Kara keeps her cards close to her chest. It was wonderfully intense and fascinating from the start. I was really delighted by Lesley Kara’s writing, and just like her first novel, Who Did You Tell is an explosive page turner, as it highlights the psychological aspects of a closely guarded secret that the lead character is desperately trying to move on from, along with the errors she has made. Told from Astrid’s perspective, I was able to glean enlightenment into this emotionally wrecked character’s life, including her spectacular downfall, difficulties, uphill battles, anxieties, and her abundant moments of despair. I relished that it was left to me to decide whether or not to completely trust Astrid’s judgement or perception as the narrator. I also fully appreciated the author's naked, warts and all approach to the impact of alcohol dependency and its associated problems. It made this a very emotive read. Lesley Kara’s plotting was astute - she keeps the reader locked into the story right the way through this novel made easier by the short and succinct chapter format. There was no long-winded and meandering passages here! The characterisation was very assured, especially in Astrid's case but also the supporting cast. The additional protagonists helped to provide an air of suspense and mystery along with a general sense of the unknown. I found this a nervous read, but always with a strong undercurrent of anticipation, along with the unexpected. I didn't guess the ending although I had fun trying, and the finale was fabulous! I received a complimentary digital copy of this novel, at my request, from Random House UK, Transworld Publishing via NetGalley and this review is my own unbiased opinion.
  • 0 person found this review helpful

    0 people found this review helpful

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful

    Thanks for your feedback!

    Compelling and engrossing

    From the Sunday Times bestselling author of "The Rumour" comes another cracking story from Lesley Kara. I was looking forward to reading this after having read and enjoyed Ms Kara's debut novel "The Rumour" and I certainly wasn't disappointed although this was sometimes a difficult read due to the main character, Astrid, being a recovering alcoholic with a chequered history. Initially, Astrid was a difficult character to like but as the novel moved on, I found myself rooting for her to succeed against the inner voices in her head pulling her back towards the demon drink and although I am not an alcoholic, recovering or current, it does feel authentic. The way Ms Kara describes the impact addiction has not only on the person themselves but also on the family and wider relationships is well captured in this book. Astrid is trying to rebuild her life - moving back to her childhood home to live with her mum, attending AA meetings, trying to rekindle her gift of painting, rebuilding the trust of her mum but she is full of shame and guilt regarding events she recalls from her past drinking days; events that only she and her ex-boyfriend know about or so she thought ... someone is watching her, someone is sending her notes, someone is going out of their way to try and prevent her from moving on. The book is told mainly from Astrid's point of view with snippets included from the "stalker's" perspective. This, I think, was genius as it not only immersed me into Astrid's thought processes and daily struggles with addiction but also gave me an idea of what she was up against. The story starts quite slowly but develops in intensity and pace with twists along the way and although you would think it would be heavy-going given the subject matter, it isn't as there are lighter moments sprinkled throughout. All of the characters are well developed and interesting and the setting of the small coastal town is perfect. This is a compelling and engrossing read dealing with a difficult subject matter with sensitivity and one I would definitely recommend to readers who like to get their teeth into something a bit different. Many thanks to RandomHouse UK, Transworld Publishers via NetGalley for my copy in return for an honest and unbiased review.
13

You can read this item using any of the following Kobo apps and devices:

  • DESKTOP
  • eREADERS
  • IOS
  • ANDROID
  • TABLETS
  • WINDOWS