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  • Literary Titan

    Into the Macrocosm by Konn Lavery is a collection of thought-provoking short stories about an unknown character who is the observer of 22 deaths. At the beginning of this intellectually invigorating collection readers are given intriguing theories on life after death. Konn Lavery addresses these theories in multiple ways, all of which are fictional in nature but spiritual at heart. Although the character is more of an observer in these stories, I like how I can still feel the personal connections while reading along. It was easy to get entangled in these insightful stories and there was a sense of adventure that was consistent throughout these stories. I also appreciated the subheadings in this collection because it helped me keep track of special events that lead to the plot twists. Into The Macrocosm has so many fascinating stories that it will be impossible for readers to find at least one that speaks to them. None of the stories are overly horrifying, nor would I put these stories in the horror genre, there is just an ever-present ominous feeling that permeates these stories, enough to give you goosebumps rather than frighten you outright. This is a metaphysical exploration that leaves you with thoughts that are hard to shake. The way spiritual transformation is portrayed was enough for me to set the book down and ponder the implications for a bit. I loved that this collection used these dark stories to highlight the importance of self-awareness. I also loved how the author showed how much the darkness within us and around us can weigh us down. Konn Lavery's Into The Macrocosm is an exceptional short story collection that explores some provocative ideas through a darkly imaginative lens reminiscent of Edgar Allen Poe or H.P. Lovecraft.

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  • A compelling read

    Reviewed by Lit Amri for Readers' Favorite "The observer is only able to watch and never interact. As their reality fades, yours become real until control of your body returns. You are you once more, in the Midway with the strange ghoul who guides you in discovering your lost past." In Into the Macrocosm (Short Stories of the Dark Cosmic, Bizarre, and the Fantastic) by Konn Lavery, the reader is the Nameless One, whose soul’s trajectory is interrupted from its natural passage. Guided by the ghoul Malpherities, the search for clues is an anthology itself, connected not by themes but by a goal to find the reason the Nameless One ends up in the Midway realm. Different people in different times, the stories are as diverse as their characters, ranging from familiar to surreal, from an angsty teenager to a knight from a lost world. A paranormal event or just a trick of the mind? A teen is urged by a talking goat to make a move on his crush while high on weed in "Goat Wisdom". In "Inspirer", a man is tricked by his own delusional mind and makes an irreversible decision. Sci-fi fans will enjoy "Harvesters", set in a post-apocalyptic Earth where people are treated like cattle by superior beings. The story continues in "Scrappers", as two people tasked with finding metal junk for the surviving human base underground stumble upon a crashed Harvester and a dangerous beast. It is a sci-fi delight that deserves to be a full novel. Stories such as a demonic teddy bear in "Mr. Super" and man-eating large birds in "Otherkin" will entertain horror lovers, while "Option Three" is an introspective piece for everyone. As compelling as these stories are, the focus will always return to the Nameless One, Malpherities, and their hunt for an answer. With an engaging narrative and evocative artwork, Konn Lavery's Into the Macrocosm is an entertaining embrace of fantastical oddities and life beyond.

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  • Some of the best short stories I've ever read!

    In death, the soul leaves the body but where does it go? Travel through time and space to an eerie universe known as the Macrocosm, where souls regain their memories of not only how they died but what happens next. The journey is challenging and wrought with peril. Anyone can observe what happens but they better tread softly or else they might never escape those lurking behind them... Into the Macrocosm is a short-story collection of some of the best dark fantasy, horror, and speculative fiction stories I've ever read. As a reader of the great masters of the genre, I found each story activated my imagination with the same morbid fascination as one stares at a gruesome accident. Each story is woven with a precise, well-executed plot, tight characters, just the right amount of suspense and creep factor. The world-building is exceptional, and each story transported me inside the world Konn Lavery has created. Some were downright scary while others had the mystique of horror. The Nameless One is the perfect main character as it's easy to insert oneself into him to observe all that is going on. Konn Lavery is a brilliant writer and I give him credit for weaving complete stories in the short story format. If you're a fan of Poe, The Twilight Zone, or Lovecraft, you need to read Into the Macrocosm. Highly recommend! My Rating: 5+ stars

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