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    Bitterly Boring

    Lee Mackenzie has climbed her way back up from rock bottom. At the bottom of the pit she was known to those close to her, particularly her husband, as Donna. This book is the true story of how she met and married her husband, Kenner Jones, despite being countries apart. Donna had traveled to London and met Kenner at a tourist shop. Through conversation, Kenner discovers that Donna is in need of a place to stay. So he offers his mother’s hospitality and Donna takes him up on it. She endured story after story from Kenner’s mother, Primrose, but took it as worth the money she saved. Donna had returned to her home country, Canada, and started receiving letters from Kenner. Kenner had ended up in prison as the victim of a misunderstanding and his mother is in need of financial assistance. Donna sends money from each paycheck to Primrose and continues to correspond with Kenner. This is the second step down into the pit of naiveté. Upon Kenner’s release, Donna goes back to London to visit him. He proposes. She accepts and goes back to Canada to save up for their wedding and future. They marry in Canada and then everything starts to fall apart. The deception builds as their marriage crumbles. Donna is caught in a landslide of broken dreams, debt, and torn between her husband and her future. This is all told in Donna’s point of view and partly in letters from Kenner to Donna. These letters provide a deeper glance into who Kenner portrayed himself to be. Without these letters, I do not believe I would have continued to read the book. I would have just tossed it aside as a bitter tale of a woman scorned. The other added depth to the book was the inclusion of other people deceived by Kenner. Although this book is classified as true crime (which is my tv preference) it did not leave me gasping in disbelief. Rather, it left me putting it down often and picking up another book instead. It felt like when one goes to get a coffee with an acquaintance or old friend and the cell phone tucked away in a purse or pocket is more tempting than hearing more bitter stories. It was predictable and the details that were focused on did not add to the story, in my opinion. I would not recommend this book for anyone offended by deception and miscarriages. I did not note any foul language, violence, or sexual themes. Please note: an electronic copy of this book was generously provided by the publisher via NetGalley, in exchange for an honest review.
5

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