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Ratings and Reviews (5 5 star ratings
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    A Significant, Engaging Adventure into our History

    In “The Methodist Man”, the author exposes critical historical details that he weaves into an intimate read of "creative non-fiction" reflecting a significant part of our history. By tying Robert Rundle’s journal entries to the sequence of events occurring on the Canadian prairies during the 1840s, the reader is brought to a clearer understanding of the undercurrents that established the lens with which we immigrant descendants have viewed indigenous people for over 200 years. Through Rundle’s eyes we see how a man of God struggles to balance his commitment to the Hudson Bay Company with his core Christian values. Documentation of his adventurous excursions in a hostile land, challenges by both natives and his HBC Factor, and his tortuous dreams illustrate the intensity of this conflict. Yet, Rundle, driven by his faith and strength of character soldiers on to make the best of a bad situation. There is a lot of ‘meat’ in this fast-paced, educational story that frames the frustration that exists between all sides even today. I like how this author pens details between the lines of archival fact to both document the actual record, and keep the reader emotionally involved by bringing the history home in an engaging manner.
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    A Trip into the Canadian West of the 1840s

    This book takes you on a trip into the Canadian West as it existed in the 1840s. The "Methodist Man" is Robert Terrill Rundle who was the first preacher to venture into what is now Alberta, driven by his zeal to convert the Natives to his Wesleyan Methodist faith. Rundle manages to survive under the protection of the Hudson's Bay Company which is not sympathetic with his mission as it fears converting the Natives will disrupt the fur trade. The author brings out the drama of the times best in the other main protagonist, "Sees Far," an influential leader in the Blackfoot Confederacy. Sees Far has little sympathy for the intrusion of White Man's civilization as he is more concerning about ensuring his tribe can survive winter storms, the loss of the Buffalo as their main food source, and the constant threat of war with enemy tribes, particularly the Cree of the plains. The author has skillfully painted a impressive and knowledgeable picture of the harsh life on the Canadian prairies at that time.
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    A strong original approach.

    This novel turns a microscope onto pre-Canadian prairie politics in the 1840s. It details the facscinating co-dependency of the Hudson's Bay Company with various rival indigenous Nations. An itinerant Methodist Minister from England is thrown into the mix for spice. I love books that hold my interest and teach me something new.
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    The Methodist Man

    This historical novel is set in a time and place that I knew very little about; that is the Canadian Prairies in the 1840s. Two very different courageous and determined men: Robert Rundle (a Cornishman) and Sees Far (a Blackfoot) struggle to improve the fate of the indigenous people. Neither one really succeeds in their endeavours, but their attempts to do so make a story which is hard to put down. And, while being entertained by the story, I came away with a better understanding of the people and their struggles at that time and in that place.
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    Important insight.

    Although I studied and taught Canadian History for forty years, I had learned little about the West prior to the building of the CPR. This historical novel, using the journals of Methodist missionary Robert Terrill Rundle, offers real insight into a little reported and often neglected history of the Hudson Bay Territories during the 1840s. It describes how the Company, the Church of England, the First Nations, Catholic and Protestant missionaries and Voyageurs interacted. Value conflicts were the norm both within and between the various players, providing tension and holding the reader’s interest. The conflicts Rundle had with his own beliefs are eye-opening. They are still played out today. A book well-worth a read.
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