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The Dark Side
The Dark Side

Step too close to the edge.
Look a killer in the eye.
Feel a chill run up your spine.

Simon & Schuster Canada and Kobo are pairing up to bring you Dark Side Reads, a collection of the best in mystery, thriller, horror, and suspense, by authors who are experts in fear.

Each month, we’ll focus on a new release, bringing you never-before-seen content, amazing eBook deals, monthly themed giveaways, Twitter chats, and more!

Need more Dark Side Reads? The newest releases are just the start. Dark Side Reads offers a curated list of the best in dark reads from the last twenty years. Get our top picks—from Jeffery Deaver and John Connolly to Sandra Brown and J.A. Jance—we’ll release a new selection of eBook deals each month. For the most voracious readers, the finale feature in June includes seventy Dark Side Reads eBooks.

Think you can handle it? We’re starting off with Nick Cutter, whose debut, The Troop, Stephen King called “old-school horror at its best.” In Little Heaven, Cutter returns with an epic tale that chronicles the terror when hell, or the closest thing to it, invades a remote New Mexico settlement. In February, we’re off to Italy, where Sandrone Dazieri’s Kill the Father follows a young man recovering from a childhood spent trapped in a concrete silo. From the deepest realms of horror, to the fast-paced thrillers everyone is buzzing about, we have books to satisfy every dark side reader.

Join us with #DarkSideReads on Twitter and Facebook.

FacebookTwitter

grey line with shadow
Nick Cutter credit: Elizabeth Whitehead

“ Why do I write? Well, I guess because there’s nothing else that, on a professional level, gives me the same joy. ”

Interested in knowing more about the author of “Little Heaven”?
Nick Cutter gives us a look into his Writing Life

I could write anywhere, honestly. Point me towards a pile of busted bricks or a swamp or wherever and I’d say, “Okay, let me get my galoshes” and I’d write there. Some writers have really cool, pristine, book-lined offices. I could certainly write in one of those, but at the moment, I write in the spare bedroom of our little three-bedroom house in the west end of Toronto. A little Wal-Mart desk, a wooden chair, the spare bed behind me. I’ve got notes taped on the wall too. After I finish a book or story, those notes come down and go in a file folder or in the trash, and new notes for the new project go up.

The “Hows” of my writing: I write in the morning. After a cup of coffee, some oatmeal or eggs, I take my son to daycare and then try to get the writing day started at nine a.m. I write until I have about 1,000 words minimum. I could do more, but 1,000 is the minimum per day unless I’ve got appointments or other commitments or really, the story’s just not clicking along. Sometimes I have that 1,000 done in a few hours and I have the afternoon to do whatever; other times it’s night and I’m still struggling to get that 1,000. I’m not as crazy about it as I once was. I don’t beat my head against the wall trying to fulfill some numerical obligation as there’s little sense or profit in that.

Why do I write? Well, I guess because there’s nothing else that, on a professional level, gives me the same joy. Of course it also vexes me and leaves me dispirited from time to time, like I didn’t quite accomplish what I’d set out to do. But overall, yeah—I mean, there are tougher gigs, but writing’s tough enough that if you don’t like doing it, why the hell else would you keep plugging away?

Little Heaven was written like most every book I’ve done: you find some characters you love and empathize with and feel you can follow (or hate and loathe and want to see bad things happen to, as one does), and you put them through their paces. That’s the genesis for me: characters that you as a writer want to follow, see grow, see fail or succeed (or fail then succeed, or vice versa). Character’s the root of everything for me.

“Little Heaven” trailer

“Little Heaven” trailer

Discussion with Nick Cutter

Discussion with Nick Cutter
The Dark Side

Step too close to the edge.
Look a killer in the eye.
Feel a chill run up your spine.

Simon & Schuster Canada and Kobo are pairing up to bring you Dark Side Reads, a collection of the best in mystery, thriller, horror, and suspense, by authors who are experts in fear.

Each month, we’ll focus on a new release, bringing you never-before-seen content, amazing eBook deals, monthly themed giveaways, Twitter chats, and more!

Need more Dark Side Reads? The newest releases are just the start. Dark Side Reads offers a curated list of the best in dark reads from the last twenty years. Get our top picks—from Jeffery Deaver and John Connolly to Sandra Brown and J.A. Jance—we’ll release a new selection of eBook deals each month. For the most voracious readers, the finale feature in June includes seventy Dark Side Reads eBooks.

Think you can handle it? We’re starting off with Nick Cutter, whose debut, The Troop, Stephen King called “old-school horror at its best.” In Little Heaven, Cutter returns with an epic tale that chronicles the terror when hell, or the closest thing to it, invades a remote New Mexico settlement. In February, we’re off to Italy, where Sandrone Dazieri’s Kill the Father follows a young man recovering from a childhood spent trapped in a concrete silo. From the deepest realms of horror, to the fast-paced thrillers everyone is buzzing about, we have books to satisfy every dark side reader.

Join us with #DarkSideReads on Twitter and Facebook.

FacebookTwitter

grey line with shadow
Nick Cutter credit: Elizabeth Whitehead

Why do I write? Well, I guess because there’s nothing else that, on a professional level, gives me the same joy.

Interested in knowing more about the author of “Little Heaven”?
Nick Cutter gives us a look into his Writing Life

I could write anywhere, honestly. Point me towards a pile of busted bricks or a swamp or wherever and I’d say, “Okay, let me get my galoshes” and I’d write there. Some writers have really cool, pristine, book-lined offices. I could certainly write in one of those, but at the moment, I write in the spare bedroom of our little three-bedroom house in the west end of Toronto. A little Wal-Mart desk, a wooden chair, the spare bed behind me. I’ve got notes taped on the wall too. After I finish a book or story, those notes come down and go in a file folder or in the trash, and new notes for the new project go up.

The “Hows” of my writing: I write in the morning. After a cup of coffee, some oatmeal or eggs, I take my son to daycare and then try to get the writing day started at nine a.m. I write until I have about 1,000 words minimum. I could do more, but 1,000 is the minimum per day unless I’ve got appointments or other commitments or really, the story’s just not clicking along. Sometimes I have that 1,000 done in a few hours and I have the afternoon to do whatever; other times it’s night and I’m still struggling to get that 1,000. I’m not as crazy about it as I once was. I don’t beat my head against the wall trying to fulfill some numerical obligation as there’s little sense or profit in that.

Why do I write? Well, I guess because there’s nothing else that, on a professional level, gives me the same joy. Of course it also vexes me and leaves me dispirited from time to time, like I didn’t quite accomplish what I’d set out to do. But overall, yeah—I mean, there are tougher gigs, but writing’s tough enough that if you don’t like doing it, why the hell else would you keep plugging away?

Little Heaven was written like most every book I’ve done: you find some characters you love and empathize with and feel you can follow (or hate and loathe and want to see bad things happen to, as one does), and you put them through their paces. That’s the genesis for me: characters that you as a writer want to follow, see grow, see fail or succeed (or fail then succeed, or vice versa). Character’s the root of everything for me.

“Little Heaven” trailer

“Little Heaven” trailer

Discussion with Nick Cutter

Discussion with Nick Cutter
The Dark Side

Step too close to the edge.
Look a killer in the eye.
Feel a chill run up your spine.

Simon & Schuster Canada and Kobo are pairing up to bring you Dark Side Reads, a collection of the best in mystery, thriller, horror, and suspense, by authors who are experts in fear.

Each month, we’ll focus on a new release, bringing you never-before-seen content, amazing eBook deals, monthly themed giveaways, Twitter chats, and more!

Need more Dark Side Reads? The newest releases are just the start. Dark Side Reads offers a curated list of the best in dark reads from the last twenty years. Get our top picks—from Jeffery Deaver and John Connolly to Sandra Brown and J.A. Jance—we’ll release a new selection of eBook deals each month. For the most voracious readers, the finale feature in June includes seventy Dark Side Reads eBooks.

Think you can handle it? We’re starting off with Nick Cutter, whose debut, The Troop, Stephen King called “old-school horror at its best.” In Little Heaven, Cutter returns with an epic tale that chronicles the terror when hell, or the closest thing to it, invades a remote New Mexico settlement. In February, we’re off to Italy, where Sandrone Dazieri’s Kill the Father follows a young man recovering from a childhood spent trapped in a concrete silo. From the deepest realms of horror, to the fast-paced thrillers everyone is buzzing about, we have books to satisfy every dark side reader.

Join us with #DarkSideReads on Twitter and Facebook.

FacebookTwitter

grey line with shadow
Nick Cutter credit: Elizabeth Whitehead

Interested in knowing more about the author of “Little Heaven”?
Nick Cutter gives us a look into his Writing Life

Why do I write? Well, I guess because there’s nothing else that, on a professional level, gives me the same joy.

I could write anywhere, honestly. Point me towards a pile of busted bricks or a swamp or wherever and I’d say, “Okay, let me get my galoshes” and I’d write there. Some writers have really cool, pristine, book-lined offices. I could certainly write in one of those, but at the moment, I write in the spare bedroom of our little three-bedroom house in the west end of Toronto. A little Wal-Mart desk, a wooden chair, the spare bed behind me. I’ve got notes taped on the wall too. After I finish a book or story, those notes come down and go in a file folder or in the trash, and new notes for the new project go up.

The “Hows” of my writing: I write in the morning. After a cup of coffee, some oatmeal or eggs, I take my son to daycare and then try to get the writing day started at nine a.m. I write until I have about 1,000 words minimum. I could do more, but 1,000 is the minimum per day unless I’ve got appointments or other commitments or really, the story’s just not clicking along. Sometimes I have that 1,000 done in a few hours and I have the afternoon to do whatever; other times it’s night and I’m still struggling to get that 1,000. I’m not as crazy about it as I once was. I don’t beat my head against the wall trying to fulfill some numerical obligation as there’s little sense or profit in that.

Why do I write? Well, I guess because there’s nothing else that, on a professional level, gives me the same joy. Of course it also vexes me and leaves me dispirited from time to time, like I didn’t quite accomplish what I’d set out to do. But overall, yeah—I mean, there are tougher gigs, but writing’s tough enough that if you don’t like doing it, why the hell else would you keep plugging away?

Little Heaven was written like most every book I’ve done: you find some characters you love and empathize with and feel you can follow (or hate and loathe and want to see bad things happen to, as one does), and you put them through their paces. That’s the genesis for me: characters that you as a writer want to follow, see grow, see fail or succeed (or fail then succeed, or vice versa). Character’s the root of everything for me.

“Little Heaven” trailer

“Little Heaven” trailer

Discussion with Nick Cutter

Discussion with Nick Cutter