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Ratings and Reviews (4 23 star ratings
4 reviews
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3.7 out of 5
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    You're in for a treat.

    "Stalin’s Gold" is the second book in the Frank Merlin series. The first book, "Princes Gate", was set in the so-called phoney war in February 1940, but in this book it is September 1940 and the Battle of Britain is at its height. Hitler foolishly decided to leave the airfields alone and bomb the city of London instead. This gave the Royal Air Force time to reform and fight back. In this turmoil of dogfights in the sky, falling bombs and burning and collapsing houses, Frank Merlin and his team have to deal with gang-related looters and a missing Polish RAF Hurricane pilot. As in the previous book, the atmosphere in Stalin’s Gold is palpable. Even readers who are not really into reading thrillers will probably like this series because the books are very well written and it is just as much about the atmosphere of wartime London as it is about who committed the crime. After reading the book, I felt like I had personally paid a visit to 1940s London, which is a great achievement for sure. Stalin’s Gold is nicely paced and Mark Ellis takes his time to bring the different story lines together. In the end it all makes sense. One other thing I like about this series is that the characters are believable. The good guys and gals are not just good and the bad ones are not just bad. For instance, in this book there is a Polish RAF pilot who has done something terrible to a Jewish family in his country but is now defending the British against the German bombers. He is also friends with another Polish airman who he knows has Jewish blood. In this book we’re only in September 1940. I hope that Mark Ellis will keep this series going at this rate. I don’t know how many books he has planned but there’s half a year in between the time span of the first two books and at least 4 more years to go in the Second World War. That would make a total of about 12 books, if you also count the year 1945 (wishful thinking on my part, maybe). If the rest of the series is of the same high standard as Princes Gate and this book Stalin’s Gold, we’re in for a real treat. I’m really looking forward to the next book to revisit Mark Ellis’ version of wartime London.
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    Great mystery in WW2

    Great story and I like the author's writing style. The setting and characters were quite believable. If you like good mysteries set in the second world war you will like this read. I have just downloaded a second book from this author
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    Reader

    A rather convoluted story based upon an unexplained monumental clerical error which strains belief. One wonders why the treasure was surrendered to Stalin, who didn't deserve it, rather than the Mexican government, who's ancestors appear to have been the only rightful owners. However, it's a fun read with typically British good guys and typically Russian bad guys and typically hapless Poles.
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    Boring

    Struggled for 6 chapters then gave up. No apparent plot merely boring trivia about the everyday lives of various characters via which the author displays his totally irrelevant knowledge of literature an art. A waste of money
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