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Ratings and Book Reviews (14 22 star ratings
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4.6 out of 5
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    Yay! Shadows Over England' Theme/Characters Return

    London 1917, WWI Margot De Wilde has returned to us as a key player in this story featuring Room 40 and the life of Codebreakers whose sole job is to decode war messages in various forms day in and day out. She has always seen life through numbers. The Lord speaks to her in numbers. She calculates every step and motion with the utmost effectiveness. At 17, she is generally the most intelligent person in a room. However, her intelligence and calculations leave little room for emotion. Drake Elton is an undercover agent and a very good one. His younger sister Dot struggles through life and he needs to see her settled with a job before he heads out on his next assignment. In doing so, he meets a girl with “impossibly dark eyes” who challenges his thoughts. But, he has little time to delve into that while a war is raging and answers need uncovering. Das Gespenst proves to be a mysterious villain and adds the necessary element of danger. His character was interesting while trying to discover his “angle”. He also brought a GO board with him, another attention-grabbing throw-back to the previous series. The story is continually moving forward at a great pace as the players in the war, on both sides, do their parts. Reading about anthrax and the effort to uncover code books from U-boats, Zeppelins and Gotha bombers were very interesting. Tea Quotes: “Here you go.” Cheerful and smiling and utterly oblivious, she handed him a cup of steaming, fragrant tea. “Just the way you like.” “And after another night shift, she was more than looking forward to a hot cup of tea, her clanking radiator, and maybe a not-warm-enough bath before she went to bed.” Spiritual Moment: “Do not neglect your prayers, Drake. Neglect your chores, neglect your ablutions, neglect your mother, but never neglect our prayers. They are what root you to the Lord.” Wonderfully written as always. While we do get to visit old friends, you do NOT need to have read the previous series as plenty of backstory is scattered within this book. I would also add, that while the time frame is WWI, you are not dragged through the gruesomeness of war. I very much appreciated that. I am looking forward to Phillip Camden’s future story. It is my privilege to share my opinion without expectation or compensation. I received an advance copy without charge from BETHANY HOUSE PUBL. SERIES: The Codebreakers The Number of Love – Book 1 June 4, 2019 Wings of Devotion – Book 2 tba
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    The Number of Love

    The Number of Love begins a new series by Roseanna M White called Codebreakers. Readers are introduced to Margot de Wilde, a Belgian teen, breaking German codes during World War I. She wants all she can to help her country. I have enjoyed reading books by this author in the past and The Number of Love does not disappoint. Margot is a fabulous character that I loved getting to know. her story is full of adventure, danger, mystery, action and suspense. This kept me intrigued and I wanted to keep reading. I have it read from start to finish in one sitting. I am giving The Number of Love four and a half stars. I look forward to the next installment from the Codebreakers series, On Wings of Devotion. I recommend this one to readers who enjoy clean historic fiction, especially involving the first World War. I think it is definitely a must read. I received this book from the publisher. This review is 100% my own honest opinion.
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    An Outstanding Story!

    "The numbers marched across the page in a glory all their own." Margot De Wilde stays quite busy using her prodigious mathematical prowess to aid England's intelligence network at its highest level; in short, Margot is a codebreaker. She would rather calculate the number of bricks used to construct a building, than bat her eyes in flirtation; thus keeping her male counterparts in Room 40 at a comfortable distance. That is until one day, when Lieutenant Drake Elton barged into her private conversation of numbers and popped just the right question, "Have you a name?" Drake Elton cannot forget the girl without a name, whose dark eyes pervade his memory through-out the hours of his dangerous days and nights. When his own service as an intelligence agent is interrupted by a life threatening injury, Drake returns home to England to recuperate and discovers the enigmatic Margot De Wilde once again; this time at the side of his hospital bed, in the shadow of his beloved sister. Unfortunately, all is not fair in love and war as pundits would have us to believe, for there are some puzzles that seem impossible to solve, or perhaps it's just a matter of asking the right question. "Three, nine, twenty-seven, eighty-one . . . Eighteen. Eighteen. Eighteen." The number of love. Outstanding hardly seems adequate to describe the manner in which Roseanna White has brought these characters to life! I received a copy of this book from the author and publisher. The opinions stated above are entirely my own.
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    3 Reasons You Should Read The Number of Love

    I think I love spy novels even more than frontier stories. I don't know if it's the secret codes or the chance to become someone you're not. The way people who aren't quite normal in regular life find meaning and purpose. At least a little bit of it is the way the work that is done in secret can save lives, stop wars before they start, or reduce the casualty count. Maybe it's because there are spies in the Bible. But if spy novels are just plain awesome, historical spy novels are the next level. My favorites are World War I, World War II, Cold War stories. Today's technology makes for some great gadgets, but I love the human element and the old school, hands-on ways of doing things. So take my love for historical fiction, all things intelligence, and the last Roseanna M. White book I read, and you can bet I was eagerly anticipating The Number of Love. A Great WWI Story Ms. White tells a great story, long enough for my taste too! She'll make you fall in love with the world of WWI codebreakers, and with a young lady who thinks and feels in the land of numbers. This gal is really, really smart! You'll feel a sense of good vs. evil and a sense of purpose - even a hunger to find purpose in what you do every day. And you may find yourself thinking about the "bad guy" through different eyes too. I am really looking forward to reading more of The Codebreakers series! This Girl is a True Believer I was so glad to get to know a cast of characters with a Catholic background. See, while I'm not Catholic, and I'm not always on the same page theologically with my Catholic brothers and sisters, we serve the same Christ. In Protestant circles, Catholics have a reputation for being more ritualistic than religious, but I think you'll find the same thing to some degree in any tradition. In every group of Christians, you'll find "nominal" believers (I call them "cultural Christians") and true believers. The Catholics in this story, like so many, are true believers, and their journey of faith so closely resembles mine. Enemy or Opponent? I loved how our heroine, Margot, sees the enemy. When her home was occupied in Belgium by the Germans years before, she learned "that a uniform didn't make a man by nature a friend or an enemy. But choice did." Even as she faithfully serves as a codebreaker in the secret Room 40, her desire is not to see the enemy destroyed but the enemy stopped. At the end of the day, at the end of the battle, at the end of the war, the guy in the other uniform is a son, a brother, a father, a husband, a patriot. Margot's love for her enemy comes out in a beautiful way at the end of the story. "Das Gespenst," one of the German spies in The Number of Love, thinks of Margot not as an enemy, but an opponent. The difference is honor. Respect. And a different desire, because when you defeat your opponent, you can shake hands and move on to the next match. When you defeat an enemy, the enemy is destroyed. Margot's war, "The Great War" as it was called, seems a lot more cut-and-dry than some of our wars today. Today the battle lines seem more blurry. How much more important, then, is Margot's perspective? On the other side of the battle, no matter how important, is another human, another life created in God's image. It doesn't mean we shouldn't fight. There are times to stand and fight, to come between evil and the innocent and say "it stops here." But we fight with God's heart for those who oppose us. We grieve when there is loss, because God grieves. Maybe, too, we can fight in the way of honor. A way that honors God, that honors those who have gone before us, and yes, even our opponents. The Number of Love reminds us that in whatever fight, be it on the battlefield, the courtroom, or even with your coworker or neighbor or your teenager, we can remember that Satan, not the human in front of us, is the real enemy. 43 “You have heard that it was said, You must love your neighbor[a] and hate your enemy. 44 But I say to you, love your enemies and pray for those who harass you45 so that you will be acting as children of your Father who is in heaven. He makes the sun rise on both the evil and the good and sends rain on both the righteous and the unrighteous. 46 If you love only those who love you, what reward do you have? Don’t even the tax collectors do the same? 47 And if you greet only your brothers and sisters, what more are you doing? Don’t even the Gentiles do the same? 48 Therefore, just as your heavenly Father is complete in showing love to everyone, so also you must be complete. - Matthew 5:43-48 CEB I received a review copy of this book; all opinions are my own.
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    Codebreakers

    The Number of Love, book #1 in the Codebreakers, is set in mainly London 1917, during WWI. I instantly took a strong liking to the main female character, Margo. She was intelligent beyond measure, very opinionated with a wicked wit. She was the only woman in the field of code breaking the enemies messages. The rest of the women were secretaries. But the men respected her to the point of thinking of her as one of them. She had plans to further her education after the war with no plans for marriage or children. Drake was an intelligence agent (or spy) for the allies. They spend a good amount of time together getting to know each other through his sister Dot, who Margo befriends. I was fascinated with Margo’s love for numbers. She counted everything in her going and coming each day, steps, tiles, bricks in a building, stitches in a blouse, etc. God put numbers in her mind that caused her to listen, stop, and pray. This was an interesting story in the time of war that included secrets, spying, revenge, grief and a touch of romance. Be sure and read the author’s notes in the back. Although fiction, some of the history included was real as well as a few characters. I received an ebook copy of this book from the publisher through Celebrate Lit but was not required to write a review positive or otherwise.
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