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Ratings and Book Reviews (1 27 star ratings
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4.2 out of 5
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    Insightful and Engaging

    Nate Silver's bookon thescience and limitations of prediction is both insighful and interesting, especially coming as it does from a real expert in the field. The book canvasses the successes and failures of forecasting across a range of fields. Each topic is well researched and reported with Silver often providing inteviews from leading experts in each area. The books conclusions are well thought out and provide an interesting counterpoint to the examples in the book, however it is the close analysis f the examples of forecasting failure that I found to b the most useful and applicale in the end. The one let down in this book is the errors that creep in when it leaves behind its main subject area and starts to try and give historical comparisons or context. This is most glaring in the introduction where Silver provides a thumbnail sketch of the history of the printing press to try and emonstrate the significance of the data revolution - his point is undermined by a series of small but rather glaring errors - something that is repeated throughouot her parts of the book. These points are not critical thesis thesis by any means, but there presence sadly detracts from the otherwise very credible argument that the book makes.
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