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Ratings and Reviews (3 9 star ratings
3 reviews
)

Overall rating

3.7 out of 5
9
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    Different

    Very different and totally enjoyable. Loneliness, violence and family.
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    Breadth without depth.

    Miller devotes entire chapters to pure exposition on the political landscape of Qaanaaq. However, the city itself is very difficult to visualise. We're not given much of a guide in this aspect- though the author flits between characters every ten pages, not much is learnt about their individual lives. I could tell you very little about how the poor or the rich of Qaanaaq live, despite the fact that the narrative switched between two such characters heavily at the beginning. The lack of context made it very difficult for me to immerse myself in the world and the giant walls of underwelming pseudo-profound prose made things even worse. As well as this, I couldn't help but feel apathetic towards all of the characters. Miller follows a "Tell don't Show" approach when it comes to (arguably the central character) Masaraaq in particular, who is said to "Fill rooms with her presence" but ultimately comes across as cliché and lacking all but the most basic personality.
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    Thirty Years til Blackfish City

    Prescient or reflective of current world events? A timely book to read now.
9

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