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Ratings and Book Reviews (3 4 star ratings
3 reviews
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3.5 out of 5
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    Second book in series!

    A Rebel at Pennington’s features Esther Stanbury who was raised by her mother to fight for women’s rights. Esther does not see a way to fight for what she believes in and having a family. Her father’s ultimatum is the cause. Love has a way of challenging your beliefs and resolve. Lawrence had a cruel father and he is determined to not be like him. He was forced into one arranged marriage and will not let his mother do it to him again. Each have issues to overcome before they can move forward. We get to see the struggles suffragettes faced in England. The criticism, insults, items hurled at them, and being tossed into jail. There were different groups with some who did peaceful demonstrations and others that chose a more militant approach. I thought the author captured the attitudes of the people during the time along with the atmosphere prior to George V’s coronation. I am glad that the author included Elizabeth Pennington in the story. We get to see how she is faring after taking over the store and marrying the man she loves. I enjoyed the descriptions of the windows and displays at Pennington’s. They were unique for the time period and would have attracted customers. A Rebel at Pennington’s is nicely written with steady pacing which makes it easy to read. The attraction between Esther and Lawrence is electric and unmistakable. I do want to let readers know there is mild foul language scattered throughout the book and there is a very descriptive, intimate scene. For those who love historical romances with a rebellious woman and a dashing widow, then do not miss out on A Rebel at Pennington’s.
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    Beautifully Written, Sparkling Read!

    The first book in this series, The Mistress of Pennington's, was a superb read and when I noticed that the sequel was being published I was desperate to add it to my list. You can read my review of the first one HERE. In this second novel, we get to know the head window-dresser of the department store. Esther Stanbury is not only committed to her job, but is also a member of the suffragist movement; aiming to achieve the vote for women through peaceful means and promote equality for all. When she meets Lawrence Culford, they each make assumptions about the other, and as they meet again it becomes apparent that they have much in common with both hiding their past. But is that enough? It's fair to say that I really enjoyed the first novel; I expected this one to equal it but it far surpasses it (both are stand-alone reads). The story sparkles and is full of interesting historical tidbits. Covering the lives of both the wealthy, the working class and - inevitably - touching on the plight of the poor,  this book gives a real insight into life in the capital in 1911 as well as indulging the reader in a most wonderful dance of romance. Beautifully written, this is an enthralling tale and I most definitely hope there is more to come in this series. Such a fabulous read deserves no less than a full house of fat, glowing stars!
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    Shop girl gets the vote

    There was too much repitition in this book.l lost count of the number of times shoulders were mentione. Lowering dropping letting them fall etc. Too many.
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