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  • Brilliant, Clever, Incredibly Engrossing!

    This has got to be one of the most fascinating books there is...not only does the author vividly describe poisons and toxins but also the symptoms experienced, what happens in the body molecularly, true crime stories to illustrate each and medical history. The amount of research involved must be staggering! Dr. Bradbury's writing is also very engaging. When reading the scientific details I was again reminded how miraculous the human body is. Poison enters the body by ingestion, respiration, absorption or injection. This book includes information such as the difference between toxins and poison and how they disrupt the workings of the body, antidotes, how some poisons literally create a hair's width gap in the firing of synapses (and how that gap completely alters cells and function) and how the dose itself can determine the outcome (beneficial or deadly). From "pinpoint pupils" to nerve agents from which very few recover to the most bitter substance known to man which can kill to the "sardonic grin" to the "queen of poison" to unusual antidotes to analogies to serial killers, it's here, in spades. And it could not possibly be more enthralling. I read about the fatal umbrella poke, the interesting quality of cobalt with cyanide, the first casualty of polonium, Matt Ridley's incredible information on genomes, radioactive polonium inside a man's body which was the equivalent of 175,000 x-rays, the most ancient poison. Scheele green and arsenic eaters. Highly informative and endlessly fascinating, this mind blowing book is a must for anyone remotely interested in poisons and how they work inside the body, including Agatha Christie fans! I was glued to it. My sincere thank you to St. Martin's Press and NetGalley for the privilege of reading this wondrous book!

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  • True crime, science, and history... so good!

    A Taste for Poison by Neil Bradbury is his first book and I am already looking forward to what he comes up with next! Bradbury has found the perfect formula to combine information that any true crime fan, scientist, historian, or combination will enjoy. He writes in such a way that even a high school student could understand the more technical aspects, and intertwines a sense of humor that had me wondering what kind of sass he would come up with next. But the sass was never over the top. Here’s one example from page 72: “As any sensible nineteenth-century writer would do, he elected to put the poison by his bedside rather than outside, in -say- a garden shed, in a container marked “POISON”.” And then he goes on to let us know how the mix up happened one night with the wrong pills by the bedside being taken. Never a dull moment, which can sometimes happen with writing of a more scientific or historical foundation. If you enjoy reading mysteries or true crime, like learning about science or history, or are a mystery/suspense/thriller writer, A Taste for Poison is a book you should check out.

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