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Ratings and Book Reviews (3 5 star ratings
3 reviews
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    Needs a good edit

    ‘Liam didn’t quite feel up to another etymological punching bag session with the Editor’ Always Greener is an interesting concept, a ‘tv game’ set in the future where contestants try to prove they have the worse life. We follow Liam Argyle, an alcoholic weatherman thrown into the spotlight to host the brand-new show. I enjoyed the glimpses we got into life in 2072 with its automated cars, AR displays and filters. I was a little disappointed we didn’t really get as much of an overview of the world as I would like to have had though. We get to hear Liam questioning the world around him and trying to change it for the better but without the base line of knowing what that world is it didn’t have quite as much impact as it could have done. There were other points about this book being set in the far future which annoyed me. There were a few pop culture references mentioned, such as Monty Python which very out of place in a world 50 years in the future. I don’t really think children now are being particularly introduced to it – let alone in the future! The footnotes are something that are mentioned a lot in other reviews and I must admit I also hated them. The only thing I was grateful for was that they were well-formatted into the Kindle edition I was reading. However, they really do add nothing whatsoever to the story. A few of the etymologies were quite interesting at first but a lot of them just came off as patronising. They broke up the proper flow of reading the book and I found myself trying to skip over them as much as possible. I didn’t really understand the point of them – I thought perhaps we’d find out that the ‘Editor’ was actually narrating the book or something at the end but this is never revealed. The main character finds the Editor’s use of etymology annoying so I don’t really understand why it has to be inflicted on the reader outside of his conversations. I also would have liked to get more of an in-depth look into competition and to each of the contestant’s lives. We start out being introduced to lots of people – both the successful and unsuccessful and then the next part just gives their first names which made it a little hard to follow. I would have liked to have seen a little more of what the audiences would have watched of their lives and how they dealt with issues so that when they got eliminated it actually meant something. Overall, Always Greener is a good concept but the execution fell a little flat for me which was a shame. Perhaps with a vicious edit, removing the footnotes and some key additions the book would be an awful lot better. Thank you to NetGalley, Uproar Books, The IBPA and Mr Lawless for a chance to read the ARC in exchange for an honest review.
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    Worth a read, clever writing

    The book is set in the future and is based on a big brother style game show where the viewers have a live feed to the contestants, but instead of watching them in a studio, the audience gets to see out of the contestants eyes, watching them do their day job. The main character is the game show host and the book is from his perspective. I enjoyed the story, what I really didn’t enjoy was all the footnotes. I found they interrupted the flow and honestly, I stopped reading them fairly quickly, there was just too many of them. The book didn’t totally grab me, but I did want to find out how the game would play out. Thank you #netgalley
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    Green mirror

    A book with lovely black humor and a look on (social) media to think about. I expected to have mostly a POV from the contestants, and was pleasantly surprised when it came from the host of this whole charade. I mean, I could have figured it out from the blurb, but somehow I didn't. It makes for just that different look on things with a topic like this, that makes this book more original. I also loved the ethimology-bits!
5

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