Skip to main content

Recommended For You

Loading...

Shopping Cart

You're getting the VIP treatment!

Item(s) unavailable for purchase
Please review your cart. You can remove the unavailable item(s) now or we'll automatically remove it at Checkout.
itemsitem
itemsitem

Ratings and Book Reviews ()

Overall rating

4.3 out of 5
5 Stars
39 reviews have 5 stars
4 Stars
32 reviews have 4 stars
3 Stars
8 reviews have 3 stars
2 Stars
2 reviews have 2 stars
1 Star
0 reviews have 1 stars

Share your thoughts

You've already shared your review for this item. Thanks!

We are currently reviewing your submission. Thanks!

Complete your review

All Book Reviews

  • Recommended!

    I'm happy i requested this book because I discovered an interesting author and a very good series. This book is enjoyable, entertaining and well written. I liked the characters and the world building. I look forward to reading the next installment in this series. Recommended! Many thanks to the publisher and Netgalley for this ARC, all opinions are mine.

    Thanks for your feedback!

    1 person found this review helpful

    1 people found this review helpful

    1 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • Interesting new paranormal

    There is an evil force. His last name ends in ...putin. Molly Shannon is a good wife to her attorney husband, until she discovers strange panties in her bedroom. She drops them in his martini glass (way to go Molly) and then takes everything out of his safe before she heads out the door. Molly also discovers that she is having trouble controlling the special powers that are causing objects to fly, cars to stop and fuses to blow. Josiah is masquerading as the new DA in town. He is a witch on a mission to eradicate the evil force. Josiah helps Molly survive her powers and escape the bad guys (who want what was in the safe when she left home). He also becomes her baby daddy. In the course of this book, Molly gets a divorce, dumps family and friends who do not have her best interest at heart and creates a new family in California.

    Thanks for your feedback!

    1 person found this review helpful

    1 people found this review helpful

    1 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • Great start to a new series!

    I was a little worried that I would not like this since it is not part of the Elder Races series. I am happy to say that I was wrong. I can't wait to read more!

    Thanks for your feedback!

    1 person found this review helpful

    1 people found this review helpful

    1 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • I loved the premise

    Molly Sullivan has had the strangest things happening lately. Lights have been fizzling out, her car keeps breaking down, and when she’s angry she see’s little white sparks in her vision. That last gets tested when she finds out her husband has cheated on her… again. When she confronts him, she let’s her anger take reign and her power manifests. Josiah Mason, local DA and a powerful witch in his own right, witnesses this manifestation and offers his help to Molly, which she begrudgingly takes. When she finds something hinky in her husbands finances she turns to Josiah for help. American Witch is set in the world of the Elder demesne and Thea Harrison’s previous series the Elder Races. Being totally familiar with this realm, I eagerly anticipated reading this novel. I liked Molly’s character a lot. She is getting out of marriage that ends up having a few more surprises than her own manifesting magic. The mystery of her marriage and what her husband was up to was interesting, but I’ll admit that I was disappointed in the lack of focus on Molly’s magic. If I learned that I was turning into a witch and had this amazing power I would have wanted to know everything about it! I thought she was a little disinterested in the beginning and that made it hard for me to connect with her character. Josiah Mason is driven by revenge. Not the best attribute of a leading male but he could’ve overcome that flaw if he had been a little more empathetic towards Molly. I didn’t believe their connection and didn’t really like how long and more importantly why it took him so long to put her first. Thea Harrison is a great storyteller but I thought she should have pulled the trigger on his emotions a little sooner when it came to his feelings for Molly. I fought against my ambivalence and really wanted to love this book. I didn’t hate it at all, but thought it could’ve been so much better with only a few tweaks. It’s because of this that I’m giving this novel a 3.5 rating. ❤️❤️❤️❣️ I received a free ARC of this book through NetGalley for my honest review and it was honest!

    Thanks for your feedback!

    1 person found this review helpful

    1 people found this review helpful

    1 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • Neither thriller nor romance

    I read a little romance and a lot of fantasy, so I tend to prefer stories that are heavy on magic/plot/dramatic tension and tender love stories, and light on heaving bosoms and overwhelming lust for inappropriate partners. So now you know my prejudices. American Witch begins promisingly enough with forty-something Molly Sullivan discovering that her attorney husband has been unfaithful to her . . . again. She wigs out, confronts him before the senior partner of his firm, the newly elected District Attorney, and all the guests at their elegant party, throws the contents of their safe into her suitcase, and decamps. From there, matters spin utterly out of control as she discovers banking records for an account in the Seychelles and her soon-to-be-ex comes after her in a near-lethal attack. She fights back, using magical Powers she had no idea she possessed. Soon she’s entangled with Josiah Mason, the above-mentioned DA, who is an ancient, powerful witch himself, and has gathered a coven to track down and eliminate an even older and very wicked witch (one of whose past lives will be immediately recognizable). In other words, the story hits the ground running. Alas, all that action comes to a near halt as Molly and Josiah become increasingly mired in their mutual lust and repulsion. Finally they tumble into bed together, drenched in overwhelming sexual need, with tons of pretty nicely described sexual acts. There’s even a brief discussion about birth control, for which the author would get a gold star from me except it’s not about responsible, mutually respectful sex, it’s a set-up for the inevitable contraceptive failure and resulting pregnancy. At this point, the thriller-type action comes to a screeching halt, ditto the story of how Molly learns to control and value her magical Power. Instead we have scene after scene of graphically depicted obsessive sex punctuated by statements of distrust and rejection, with only an occasional nod to Molly being a strong, independent woman. I felt as if I’d signed up for one reading experience – an urban fantasy thriller with a touch of romance – and gotten dropped into a not-so-soft porn romance. Eventually the chain of events that opened the book catch up with the lovers, but not before Molly discovers she is pregnant, decides that as long as Josiah is bent on tracking down this ancient and very bad witch he’s too dangerous to be around her and the baby, then reconnects with him, then decamps to a witches’ commune on the California coast, then reconnects, and so forth. Molly’s magical education, upon which the climax of the story ultimately relies, comes way too late in the book. Josiah gives her a few bits of advice early on, and she practices but gains facility way too easily, then she learns magical herbology and a few other nifty tricks, then all of a sudden, she is in tune with “her” elements and skilled in wiccan-esque invocations. In fact, when she calls upon her various Power-skills, it seemed to me they were drawn out of a hat. This is a shame, because there was great potential in the Western coven, its lore, techniques, and characters. Molly-coming-into-her-own and Molly-finding-her-magical-family take a back seat to the sex scenes and the merry-go-round relationship. As a reader and as a writer, I prefer eroticism to be evoked or suggested within the context of a fascinating relationship. I like characters who are comfortable with their sexuality but not incapacitated by it. So I had a problem with Molly and Josiah’s love life on several counts, as described above. The result is an imbalance in pacing and dramatic structure, with thriller-urban fantasy acting as book ends (beginning and end) to spicy romance. The opening of a book is a contract between the author and the reader. The author shows the reader what kind of experience lies within the pages, but then must deliver; it doesn’t work to switch genres in mid-book, and as much as I liked the opening of American Witch, that was my experience of the overall book. I wished the author had made up her mind what kind of story she was telling. On a more minor note, I found Molly’s pregnancy unbelievable. Certainly, pregnant women can be physically and dramatically active (with my first pregnancy, I worked full-time and trained in kung fu until my 8th month), especially during those months when she feels exceptionally well with a rush of hormone-fueled energy. Most women, however, feel different, whether it’s nauseated from morning sickness, aware of physical changes (breast size/texture/soreness, elevated heart rate, elevated body temperature, changes in joint/skin elasticity and center of gravity, and so forth). Molly never seemed pregnant to me, except for talking about it. Surely a witch in tune with moon phases and the ocean and so forth would be more aware of the significant transformation of her own body. The usual disclaimer: I received a review copy of this book, but no one bribed me to say an

    Thanks for your feedback!

    1 person found this review helpful

    1 people found this review helpful

    1 of 1 people found this review helpful

You can read this item using any of the following Kobo apps and devices:

  • DESKTOP
  • eREADERS
  • TABLETS
  • IOS
  • ANDROID