Skip to main content

More titles to consider

Loading...

Shopping Cart

You're getting the VIP treatment!

Item(s) unavailable for purchase
Please review your cart. You can remove the unavailable item(s) now or we'll automatically remove it at Checkout.
itemsitem
itemsitem

Ratings and Book Reviews ()

Overall rating

4.0 out of 5
5 Stars
1 reviews have 5 stars
4 Stars
1 reviews have 4 stars
3 Stars
1 reviews have 3 stars
2 Stars
0 reviews have 2 stars
1 Star
0 reviews have 1 stars

Share your thoughts

You've already shared your review for this item. Thanks!

We are currently reviewing your submission. Thanks!

Complete your review

All Book Reviews

  • Great Book!

    I loved this book! I know that reviews don't normally start like this but let me tell you....I LOVEd THIS BOOK! The story follows Arden who is an orphaned girl in a very male dominated society. You either belong to a rich and successful family or are married to a noble. The only other option remain safe is to be helped by a benefactor who takes you in and cares for you. This means that they take responsibility for you to get you ready for a lottery that will get you into the "Institute". If you are accepted, you will be taught proper etiquette in order to make you presentable for marriage. Arden is accepted into the Institute and the story follows her journey through the 12 week program. There is intrigue, jealousy and romance. I loved Arden. She is a very tough girl who has been through enormous challenges along her very short life. She is tough but also very vulnerable which make you want her to succeed. The romance in this book takes place at the school/institute between Beck who is a pirate, and declan who is the schools owner's son. It is not the main focus but I did enjoy it. This book does end with questions but it is not a major cliffhanger. There are some trigger warnings for this book. If you are sensitive to rape or abuse, you might want to skip this one.

    Thanks for your feedback!

    0 person found this review helpful

    0 people found this review helpful

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful

  • Powerful, Moving Story

    Arden wasn’t supposed to be chosen for the Institute. She’s spent years as a glorified servant at the home of her benefactor, under the ever-present eyes and hands of his abusive son. At first she thinks her acceptance is a joke, but the men who usher her from her small coastside town in the dark of night are serious: Arden has a place at Nordania’s renowned National Women’s Institute. There, Arden will study with the other chosen young women, receive an elite education, and gain the perfect political placement for her future. Or so she's been told. With every day, it becomes clearer that the Institute isn’t the safe haven Arden had hoped it would be. Her benefactor’s claim over her person is the one thing she can’t escape from -- no matter what she does or who tries to save her, she’s in more danger than ever. What’s the point in hoping for a better future when she might not be around to witness it? My very first impression of this story is a better-written, more political The Selection -- all good things, I have to clarify. There’s a similar structure in that a girl is chosen, seemingly at random, from a group of many applicants to participate in a competition for the best marriage match in the nation. That being said, I consider But for the Mountains to be by far the stronger of the two books. There’s more focus on the politics of Nordania, and the education Arden gains, less attention paid to the romance -- and the quality of writing is at a much higher level, and assumes a certain level of maturity and intelligence in its audience. I was drawn right into this read! The writing is beautiful, crafting the world of the story with gorgeous ease. The worldbuilding is intriguing if a bit limited; Arden is cooped up in the Institute and our only glimpses of the outside world are quite brief. There is a great deal of the story that deals with abuse, the triggers that violence can create, and how trauma lives with you long after the fact. PTSD is no joke and this book gives it the gravity it deserves. Arden’s whole life is informed by her experiences and we see that with every choice she makes. It’s striking, and haunting. And not a tale for the faint of heart or for those who may be triggered themselves. While not overtly graphic, it is devastating. My biggest complaint would be the utterly unnecessary love triangle, which not only could have been developed much further, but could have been excluded entirely. I was not expecting an ending with things left wide open, I thought this was a standalone, but I am not complaining. I’m very curious to see where Arden’s journey takes her. I hope she finds peace at the end of the road. But for the Mountains is a very real, relatable depiction of trauma and its triggers and how it can affect each and every decision you make day by day. I recommend for readers that look for stories that move them, and that don’t mind reading about the darkness before the light. Trigger warning: sexual assault/abuse, violence, physical abuse, mentions of suicide and depression/self-harm, PTSD/panic attacks, alcoholism, bullying.

    Thanks for your feedback!

    0 person found this review helpful

    0 people found this review helpful

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful

  • Three and a half

    Three and a half Well I needed to think before I reviewed this and if I’m blunt some of it I really liked and huge chunks I absolutely hated. I have seen others compare this to The Selection and as I haven’t read that cannot make a categorical comparison but yes this book does feature a lot of young women angling to marry the Prince. I personally found it much more similar to The Handmaids Tale as the women in this world are subjugated beyond the extreme ! What time period is this ? They have cars and electricity and yet the almost feudal way they live was very confusing. This book starts with a scene of abuse that admittedly wasn’t overly long but sets the scene for further demeaning acts . Arden is the victim and yet she’s strangely a lot stronger than those around her. Chosen to represent her benefactor ( honestly these people needed locking up ! ) at Court, Arden wants nothing more than to escape and finally make a good life for herself. Of course there are the prerequisite mean girls who belittle her but Arden just seems to constantly shine so much brighter than anyone else which sadly led to my eyes really wanting to roll ! Declan the apparently gorgeous Prince plays the game flirting with all the girls and yes even turning Ardens head but he’s shallow , blinkered and maybe just naively brain washed ! The high point for this reader is Beck who captains his own ship and is frequently referred to as being a bit of a roguish pirate. He confuses Arden but does try to help her at times and he certainly was a high spot for me. I won’t rehash everything but will say I’m not sure how Arden will ever escape from this suffocating culture. The end is in many ways a beginning for Arden but with many very unhappy with her actions I do not imagine an easy ride in the next book. Plus there’s a conversation between Beck and Declan that mentions brothers which actually finally started to perhaps explain odd anomalies. If you read my reviews then you know I’m a hopeless romantic so yes I do want happiness for Arden and I think you can probably guess which guy I prefer ! This voluntary take is of a copy I requested from Netgalley and my thoughts and comments are honest and I believe fair

    Thanks for your feedback!

    0 person found this review helpful

    0 people found this review helpful

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful

You can read this item using any of the following Kobo apps and devices:

  • DESKTOP
  • eREADERS
  • TABLETS
  • IOS
  • ANDROID