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Ratings and Book Reviews (4 5 star ratings
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    Emotional and thoughtful read

    Edward is a twelve year old boy traveling to California with his mother Jane, father Bruce and fifteen year old brother Jordan. The family is moving to accommodate Jane’s new job as a screenwriter. The family has always lived in New York City. We start the story with everyone trudging through the Newark airport, security, and Jordan’s newfound independence. They then board the plane, Jane in first class and the rest of the family in the back. There are brief descriptions of some of the other passengers and crew that we will meet throughout the story. Each has their own reasons for traveling to Los Angeles; some to start new lives, some for work, some for vacation. At the end of the first chapter, we move to evening of the same day when the NTSB is at the crash site of Trinity Airlines flight 2977 trying to make sense of the disaster. One person has survived this horrible crash, and that is twelve year old Edward. Now known as the “miracle boy”, we follow Edward’s story as he tries to piece back together his life. In addition and alternating with Edward’s story, we follow the time that the plane was in the air learning more about those other passengers and crew, and how that Airbus A321 ended up in pieces on the ground of a remote part of Colorado. Napolitano carefully unravels this story in bits to allow us to try to absorb what tragedy occurred on that June day in 2013. She feeds us bits of the time on the plane over the course of the next five years of Edward’s life. It is not an easy road for Edward, nor the passengers as the plane heads to its demise. Edward’s story is fascinating though, and teaches us that in every tragedy there is a chance for hope and rebirth. The book tends to be a slower read as the story unfolds. There is so much to absorb regarding Edward’s feelings. It’s not an easy read, and there are times you wonder how this boy even survives. It is beautifully written, giving us characters surrounding Edward who have their own feelings to resolve. This book is a keeper. One that made me stop and think and be thankful for what I have. 4.5 stars on Goodreads
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    An emotionally charged story

    "Dear Edward" is about Edward "Eddie" Adler, who as a twelve year old was the only survivor of a plane crash. Traveling with his parents and his older brother to move from New York to Los Angeles, the plane crashed in Colorado due to pilot error. Taken in my his aunt and uncle in New Jersey, Edward struggles to adapt to the tragedy and move on with his life. The story is told in alternating chapters; the reader becomes immersed in the chapters which describe what is happening on the plane before it crashes as well as following Edward's life from 2013, the year of the crash, to 2019, when as a recent high school graduate he is about to leave for college. I found the story very compelling. A very good read.
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    Pick it up and stick with it - You Won't Regret It

    I received a complimentary copy of this book from The Dial Press through NetGalley. Opinions expressed in this review are completely my own. Welcome to a story about surviving a plane crash. Sounds ho-hum but it certainly is not “ho-hum”! This is a journey of mending physically and mentally as the sole survivor of a plane crash, Eddie/Edward, a 12 year old, is the protagonist, and losing his entire family. Edward and many others in the book deal with profound loss. The book gives the reader insight into coping with grief and trauma in many aspects. The story flips back and forth between characters on the plane and Edward’s coping with survival after the crash. With the flipping of chapters, it successfully ties characters with their loved ones’ relationships. The author does a good job interweaving the characters onboard the plane and their loved ones. There was great character development. The title, “Dear Edward”, comes from the numerous letters he receives from many survivors’ loved ones and strangers. The letters have a variety of requests of Edward that will help with healing. The reader learns grieving takes time as it ebbs and flows. Edward leverages these letters to move on with his life. As the book progressed, I enjoyed it more and more. Pick it up and stick with it; you won’t regret it.
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    a very interesting tale

    I received a free electronic ARC copy of this excellent modern novel from Netgalley, Ann Napolitano, and Dial Press. Thank you all for sharing your hard work with me. I have read this novel of my own volition, and this review reflects my honest opinion of this work. I am pleased to recommend Dear Edward to friends and family. This is a book that speaks to the heart of the family in all its lights and shadows. Twelve-year-old Edward 'Eddie' Adler, his 15-year-old brother Jordan and his mom and dad, Bruce and Jane, begin a new life's journey, a family relocation from New York to Los Angeles. Dad didn't get tenure despite his years of hard work, but Mom was offered a job with prestige and much more money - over there. A move of such a scale is always frightening to everyone. The boys had never moved from the NY apartment they were born into. Never changed school systems, were comfortable in their neighborhood, had their friends, knew their classmates. On June 12, 2013, the Adler's and 183 others board a 7:45 am flight out of Newark, NJ for LA. We meet several of the memorable characters who fly with the Adler's, the boys and dad Bruce in general seating, and mom Jane in 1st class so she can finish the script re-write she is to hand-deliver to her new employers upon arrival in California. we meet the crew, most experienced with many hours in the air. At a little after 2 pm, Flight 2977 crashes into the ground near Greeley, Colorado. There are 191 casualties. And Eddie. Sole survivor, Badly damaged, but alive. and after several hospitalizations, he will live with his mother's younger sister, Lacey, and her husband John Curtis in New Jersey. He responds only to 'Edward'. He cannot talk to anyone - it's too hard to know what to say. He cannot sleep in the house with his Aunt and Uncle because his brother isn't there. Jordan had always been at Aunt Lacey's when they slept over. And school? That was going to be really hard. Physically, he has healed, Emotionally Edward has done as much healing as is possible. Two years after the crash the physical therapist and throat doctor has given him medical releases. Dr. Mike requires another year before he feels Edward has his mental health under control. And with the help of his Aunt, Uncle, and their neighbors Shae and her mother Besa, he holds it all together. A couple of years in, Edward and Shay find duffle bags filled with letters addressed to Eddie in John's office in the seldom-used garage. John and Lacey didn't feel like Edward could handle them when they began arriving immediately after the crash, but they couldn't throw them out, either. Letters from the families of the victims, from people who lost folks on other planes, others like him who survived and had to learn to live with that. At first, Edward and Shay keep the discovery to themselves, but they are opening and reading the letters, Shay is logging them into a database, Edward is sorting them mentally into piles to answer or contact. Surprisingly nearly three years in those letters are still arriving. John picks them up at the post office box every Friday. Once they talk with John and Lacey about the letters, it becomes a big part of every day for them all, and Edward is finally able to find some closure. And upon highschool graduation, Shay and Edward take a road trip to Greeley, Colorado, to see the memorial in place for the victims, in hopes of finding a way to accept the losses and learn to move on.
5

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