More titles to consider

Shopping Cart

You're getting the VIP treatment!

With the purchase of Kobo VIP Membership, you're getting 10% off and 2x Kobo Super Points on eligible items.

Item(s) unavailable for purchase
Please review your cart. You can remove the unavailable item(s) now or we'll automatically remove it at Checkout.
itemsitem
See your RECOMMENDATIONS

Ratings and Reviews

Overall rating

4.1 out of 5
151
5 Stars 4 Stars 3 Stars 2 Stars 1 Stars
72 45 17 8 9

Share your thoughts

You've already shared your review for this item. Thanks!

We are currently reviewing your submission. Thanks!

Complete your review

All Reviews

  • 2 person found this review helpful

    2 people found this review helpful

    2 of 2 people found this review helpful

    Thanks for your feedback!

    Deep Blue Secret

    I love finding Marmite books - books that divide opinion, you either love them or hate them. I have found some amazing books (to me) this way, which is why I prefer to read them myself rather than taking someone else's review as gospel. However, I find myself in the position of agreeing with some of the lower rated reviews for Deep Blue Secret. We start off with our young female lead, Sophie. She is complaining to herself about being (what sounds like) a normal teenager, with mood swings, depression, etc. She is supposed to be someone that everyone likes, and is prettier than she realises, but I just had trouble believing this. Once you get into the plot, there are a lot of unresolved issues that may well be sorted out in future books. However, for myself, there is simply too much for this book. I like SOME of the loose ends tied up before moving on. The big bad - he escapes from somewhere, and returns back to his son. You're not sure why he's been imprisoned in the first place. He makes a vague reference to something being surgically implanted in his chest. He is after Sadie, but is she just a convenient means to an end, or is there something about her specifically? The Water Keepers themselves - they can heal people with their special water. Why? Who chooses? Sadie turns out to "malfunctioning" - seriously? No explanation is given why (once again) although this could be a reason that is forthcoming. However, this malfunction turns her into a whiny, whinging, annoying person with an abundance on internal monologues. She gets given a necklace and told how important it is that she doesn't take it off. A couple of pages later, she has taken it off because she is mad at a boy. No explanation was given though of why this necklace is important, or just how it will help her malfunctions, so I guess I can't altogether blame her. Basically, there is a lot of nothing that goes on this book. What does happen is confusing. This maybe the book to get you hooked into the series, but for myself, it just didn't work. However, like I said at the beginning, this IS a Marmite book, so you really should find out for yourself and not take my word for it. You might really enjoy it, but it just wasn't for me. * Verified Purchase - February 2013 * Merissa Archaeolibrarian - I Dig Good Books!
  • 2 person found this review helpful

    2 people found this review helpful

    2 of 2 people found this review helpful

    Thanks for your feedback!

    Fantasy, romance, and water.

    Sadie lives with her mother in Southern California. Her father is missing though explained later in the story. Her life appears normal—the everyday concerns of a senior school student. She attracts the unwanted attention of Justin Crane until the class hunk Nick Christensen asks her for a date. Sadie’s life looks to fall into place until the accidental meeting of a mysterious boy, described as ‘a glint of light caught his eye, causing a stream of little green sparks’. Although Anderson captures the besotted emotions of teenage Sadie, infatuated by the boy with ‘mysterious green eyes’ and perfect skin, she falls short of creating dimensional characters. Likewise her descriptions of place are too sparse and cliched to capture the readers imagination. Crystal Cove is the possible exception and the reader gets the impression Anderson knows this place. Sadie suffers bouts of depression. After climbing onto a rock at the beach in Crystal Cove, she is swept into the sea and knocked unconscious. She is rescued by her mysterious friend. ‘The eyes from my dreams now hovered over me…they were like aqua diamonds’. Despite Sadie’s best efforts, her rescuer does not fall for her and leaves at the shuttle stop. The story turns abruptly from Sadie’s deep affections to Voss, an inmate surviving in an ‘inhumane’ colony for criminals. And this is where the plot gathers momentum. Cayno is not an ordinary prison. All who go there pass through the ‘thresh-hold’. Criminals sentenced to Cayno are doomed to die. Voss survives because of a stone implanted near his heart. He also has a tear-shaped Watermark on his wrist which once was blue, not turned black (a sign of all who have the water). Voss escapes the impenetrable thresh-hold by capturing a guard in a simple trap—the reader wonders why none of the numerous inmates had thought of it before. The fugitive goes on to live a charmed life in his beachside manor—he drives a McLaren and enjoys the trappings of wealth. At this point in the story the plot becomes a little thin. The reader is told Voss has a leathery face and is evil, but at no point is his evil deeds outlined. We also learn he was highly ranked in the Ambassador Council, his son Ash attending the Academy to become a Scout. While Deep Blue Secret hints at a supernatural society living amongst the ordinary populace and who are keepers of Healing Water, it fails to explain its logic. Guards who captured Voss and imprisoned him make no attempts to hunt him down and return him to Cayno. The mysterious boy is Rayne Stevens. He is Sadie’s guardian, has been since she was seven, and lives across the street from her house. Rayne is old, but the waters keep him youthful. The same waters save Sadie after a horrific car crash in which she should have died. It appears Sadie’s mother was saved from cancer while pregnant exposing Sadie to small amounts of Healing Water. Now, Sadie needs the water to live. A problem with Deep Blue Secret is the fantasy stops short of fantastic. Voss has no powers to carry out his evil and as such feels as threatening as cotton socks. Even when he abducts Sadie in order to force Rayne to do his bidding, she is treated well. Voss is defeated by Rayne in a good old punch up. Missing is wizard duels and powerful overlords with the means to destroy life as we know it. Keepers are benevolent, and even though Rayne is in breach of the code when his feelings for Sadie run deeper than that of guardian, he is never threatened or punished. Hamlin his boss reveals his secret in the end, but the reader can’t help feeling the jeperdy for Rayne’s wayward emotion could have been higher. The style on occasions is flowery. Instead of a direct ‘Voss left the room’ we have ‘After Voss removed himself from the room…’ Or, ‘the shimmering eyes glistened at my bedside like two moons in a starry sky’. Deep Blue Secret is not a bad story and will appeal to fans of the fantasy-romance genre. I give it four stars—but could have been much better.
  • 0 person found this review helpful

    0 people found this review helpful

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful

    Thanks for your feedback!

    Deep Blue Secret

    At first, found the writing simple but grew on me as the adventure developed.
  • 0 person found this review helpful

    0 people found this review helpful

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful

    Thanks for your feedback!

    Deep Blue Secret

    Wants the next one.
  • 0 person found this review helpful

    0 people found this review helpful

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful

    Thanks for your feedback!

    Water keepers book 1

    Well this was very interesting indeed if you like suspense and also fantasy stories. Keeps you engrossed for sure.
151

You can read this item using any of the following Kobo apps and devices:

  • DESKTOP
  • eREADERS
  • TABLETS
  • IOS
  • ANDROID
  • BLACKBERRY
  • WINDOWS