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Ratings and Reviews (7 45 star ratings
7 reviews
)

Overall rating

3.9 out of 5
45
5 Stars 4 Stars 3 Stars 2 Stars 1 Star
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All Reviews

  • 1 person found this review helpful

    1 people found this review helpful

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    Good

    Enjoyed the book! A little short but written well, lists of action. Will read the next one.
  • 1 person found this review helpful

    1 people found this review helpful

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    Best Neo-noir book I've read so far

    Thomas Caine is a dark enigma and an exotic new character to the spy fiction game. Andrew Warren has blended the best of Fleming and Ludlum in this contemporary action-packed blockbuster thriller that’s not just entertaining but also thought-provoking. Set in the run-down locales of Pattaya to the jungles in the Thai-Burmese border, this book speeds forward like a hollow-point bullet. Caine is a burned and betrayed CIA paramilitary operator who in this book is barely surviving by running a smuggling operation under the name of Mark Waters. Even though he recognizes the monster in him, a few shards of humanity are still fighting to survive within him. What starts as an act of protecting a hooker from one possibly abusive Russian mafia lord, leads him to work on a case of missing bar girls with an honest cop. Things turn haywire when Caine’s only friend (the hooker he saved) goes missing along with many others. The trail leads Caine to many deadly characters who’re illuminated with brilliant dialogues to become worthwhile players. The brutally violent climax where Caine shares page space with Kang who calls himself Pisac(Devil in Burmese) steals the show. Some short torture scenes and long knife fights are so passionately written that the reader can feel the very pain Caine feels. I hope the minor mistakes in proofs will be fixed with better editing in the upcoming editions. Ignoring that, anyone who’s a connoisseur of classic spy tropes blended with contemporary levels of action will love this. The amount of research that has gone into this indie novella is truly marvelous.
  • 1 person found this review helpful

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    Kept me page-turning to find out what happens next

    With the plethora of indie authors self-publishing these days, the challenge is discovering the good amongst the bad, and there is a lot of bad. Even when an indie author is a great writer and produces engaging stories, talent is not enough, so the smart indies are devoting a significant amount of time and money in marketing their books. And so they should, each year the Indie self-publishing market is showing the world more and more that the real innovation in new writing is to be found here. Traditional publishers have had a sizable portion of their market taken away from them, so they play it safe. One strategy for indie authors to get noticed is through a prequel novellas. Kind of like a pilot episode for a new television series. Ranging from 10% to 30% the length of a novel, they are teasers, introducing a character, a world, a problem before the main event, a full-length novel and — hopefully — a series. Andrew Warren has done the same with Devil’s Due, a prequel novella to his Thomas Caine Far East-focused espionage thriller series already with two novels out at the time this review was written, Tokyo Black and Red Phoenix. He’s done all the right promotion strategies by keying the branding and style for all three covers the same — a subtle but important indication that the stories are interlinked. He’s put his novella out at a reduced price, and you can down load it for free if you join his mailing list. All the boxes are ticked there. I’d read Tokyo Black before delving into Devil’s Due. Enjoying his first book I decided to try out his prequel. Like the other books in the series, we are introduced to our protagonist, Caine, a former CIA assassin who is living off the grid in Thailand after a botched operation framed him as a traitor. He’s running small time smuggling rackets, paying off the appropriate Thai crime syndicates and corrupt police forces so he’s not stepping on anyone’s toes.
  • 1 person found this review helpful

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    Good Story

    Good book, easy read, fast pace, fun to read, liked the story and characters and locations, hard to put Down once started
  • 1 person found this review helpful

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    5 stars

    My first Thomas Caine thriller. Been coming back for more sinse.
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