More titles to consider

Shopping Cart

You're getting the VIP treatment!

With the purchase of Kobo VIP Membership, you're getting 10% off and 2x Kobo Super Points on eligible items.

Item(s) unavailable for purchase
Please review your cart. You can remove the unavailable item(s) now or we'll automatically remove it at Checkout.
itemsitem
See your RECOMMENDATIONS

Ratings and Reviews

Overall rating

5.0 out of 5
1
5 Stars 4 Stars 3 Stars 2 Stars 1 Stars
1 0 0 0 0

Share your thoughts

You've already shared your review for this item. Thanks!

We are currently reviewing your submission. Thanks!

Complete your review

All Reviews

  • 0 person found this review helpful

    0 people found this review helpful

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful

    Thanks for your feedback!

    What if your child has your power?

    This time, the twist of the entire Dream series on the “What if you could see someone else’s dreams” question has taken an extra new bend. It is, “What if your child could see your dreams, and the dreams of others? What if she has your power?” Here is the first time Sara realizes that her daughter, Lizzie, can see inside her: “She was seeing—she was inside—she saw me dreaming. She’s got it just like I do.” Being inside her is doubly frightening because at this point there is a new life inside Sara: she is pregnant again. So in a way, there is a sense of violation when boundaries can be crossed like that, even when the dreamer is only a four-year old, sweet child. On the other hand, there is the motherly wish to keep her daughter safe, which in this case may mean keeping her away from people whose dreams she might penetrate. Which is exactly what happens when Sara and Lizzy meet two strangers, a woman and her son Billy, on the train. Billy’s father is being blackmailed, which will put Billy and his mother in danger. The conversations are lovely, showing you a family scene between Sara, her mom, her husband Brian, her mother-in-law, Helen, and Lizzy. It is the dialog that wraps the entire mystery in a wholesome, familiar veil, and observations such as this, about Lizzie: “Then she occupies herself by trying to get both twins smiling at the same time, which is a trick none of us have managed yet.” . And, it is also the sense of inheritance of power, and the connection between generations: “I can’t believe that in all this time, for seven whole years, I never once wondered about my mother. If Lizzy got it from me, I had to get it from somewhere too. And I never gave it a thought.” Five stars.
1

You can read this item using any of the following Kobo apps and devices:

  • DESKTOP
  • eREADERS
  • TABLETS
  • IOS
  • ANDROID
  • WINDOWS