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Ratings and Book Reviews (5 48 star ratings
5 reviews
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4.4 out of 5
48
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    5 Star Frost & Flame

    The most feared immortal warrior in all War history, Bane of Adwaeweth is possessed by a bloodthirsty beast and he will stop at nothing to win and while he hates the power Nola Lee has over him, she can rain vengeance upon his wife’s killer. Nola is battling illness and addiction, but with Bane, she experiences pleasure for the first time and wants more but being with him comes with a terrible price. Their romance will either save them both or destroy everything they’ve come to love. The second book in the ‘Gods of War’ series is an exhilarating experience that readers don’t want to miss. The author has a gift for making her worlds completely captivating and full of unique elements that makes every story a very enjoyable experience and this one is no different. The world itself it complex with lots of hidden facets, potential for backstabbing and utter violence but the story is about good fighting back against the tyranny and violence of their worlds. The fast paced plot is full thrilling suspense that has readers biting their nails and adrenaline pumping excitement that has gasping in surprise and expectation along with all of kinds of twists and turns that ensures that readers better not blink or they may miss something important. The characters themselves are strong, bold and easily grab readers’ attentions and the relationship between Bane and Nola is as complex as the war taking place. There is nothing typical in this story and every time readers think they know what will happen next…BAM, something unexpected happens. Beware, this story can be read as a standalone but takes place consecutively with the first one and of course the overall plot of the series isn’t one hundred percent complete.
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    Fantastic Immortal Warrior romance! 😍🔥

    A terrific second story in this new series by one of my favorite authors. Warrior gods from other realms land on Earth to fight for the planet and enslave its inhabitants. Well, humans don't take it laying down! A pair of sisters find the warriors and needless to say love connections form. This story runs parallel to the first in the series and has enough background that it is a standalone. The sickly Nola has been abducted by Zion and separated from Vale, her sister, and her medication. But it's the golden warrior Bane that she has a telepathic connection with and he has to get to her to avenge the death of his wife. He's a force as a fierce dragon shapeshifter beast and so twisted up in his hatred for the Queen of the beasts and any challenger to her throne that it effects his true feelings for Nola. As they fight to survive against the other warriors and her illness their connection grows and the soon chemistry turns hot. Bane is torn between his old feelings and the new ones that develop for Nola as they grow closer. Spectacular writing and a thrilling storyline with action, danger, fierce battles, foes galore, twists and turns, and a sexy romance in true Gena Showalter style makes for a fantastic read. I can't wait for the next story! I voluntarily reviewed an ARC.
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    A complex blend of reality and fantasy

    Originally posted on Tales to Tide You Over Science fiction romance requires a balance between the elements, which can be a struggle to maintain. In Frost and Flame, it’s more science fantasy, but the relationship develops along with the story in very real ways. It’s open-door romance and violence, so not for every reader, but the world building was fascinating and allowed the author to touch on deeper subjects. Right off the bat, you have a realistically portrayed female lead who suffers from fibromyalgia. Because it’s both a romance and fantasy, the costs of her condition are not always in play. At the same time, neither is she cured at first contact, reducing her disability into a checkbox. Nola must manage and work around her limitations. There’s a complicated genetic history (trying to leave it a surprise), and for most of the book, the improvement is temporary. Her condition mirrors the good days/bad days pattern if not in quality then in impact. Nola also demonstrates the inner strength necessary for survival even when it does nothing to improve her situation. This strength slowly undermines Bane’s prejudice against her bloodline and her physical weakness. Bane steps into the story with a full history (as does Nola) that informs his path. He’ll let nothing stand in his way, and he already understands everything there is to know about himself. Except when the Terran he’s been dream-walking shows up as he demanded, the foundations of his world start to crack. This is not a romance layered over a thin veneer of science fantasy. The romance and speculative fiction is twisted into a complex braid that works together. The book is set in a modern human world but with aliens bearing fantastical weapons engaged in a to-the-death battle for dominance over Earth. Humans are ignorant of the All War except for those drawn in by one of the combatants. The blend of Nola’s “normal” life as a magazine columnist into Bane’s All War existence offers humor to balance out the graphic violence. The early open-door encounters are long and detailed. The scenes include a little more rumination on the internal conflicts than I felt sustained the passionate tension, but I can’t argue how they added to the romantic development. Reflection changes their relationship, especially in how Bane and Nola see each other. Both had prejudice to overcome, though Nola would not have admitted it. She needs to see herself as he does, and he needs to separate the person from the labels he puts on her. The issues around intimacy were enhanced by their cultural differences as well. The author explored the costs of desiring forbidden acts, for example, though what Bane’s culture shamed is standard in ours. She also looked at how a female-dominant culture could be just as tyrannical as a male depending on circumstances. While not an ideal portrayal, it helps illustrate the dangers of following the norms without question. The writing drew me in most of the time, and while some seeds took a bit to grow, I enjoyed recognizing the moment odd mentions became critical. The mentions of the first book were also well done. They created interest without revealing too much for those of us that missed the start of Gods of War. There is much to enjoy in this book. It takes on difficult topics from our world and clothes them in adventure, intrigue, and fantasy so we learn by exposure without feeling taught. The relationship development between Nola and Bane is complex and goes through many cycles where self-doubt or personal history undermines confidence. The loyalty and friendship between these and many other characters, even those considered enemies, was a delight to watch. There’s a bit of a Flash Gordon vibe, but with enough unique elements to make that a strength rather than a weakness. It’s a romance, so you know Bane “gets the girl,” but Nola “gets the guy,” too, based on her own strengths and actions. Characters change, grow, fight, die, break free of physical and emotional prisons, and win new futures. There’s a little of something for most readers, and hints at explanations for history and myth we love to explore. I’m curious to see the next, and first, step on this journey. P.S. I received this ARC title from the publisher through NetGalley in return for an honest review.
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    Complex & Intriguing

    This is the second book in this complex and intriguing series. Nola and Bane's story had a lot of hate you-want you-hate you going on, which did become monotonous after awhile. Like many heroes, Bane started off as a bit of a jerk. He was filled with anger, fueled by his quest for vengeance and racked by occasional feelings of guilt. He did grow and get better and I really liked that he admitted to his sins and tried to make up for them. Nola I thought was a pretty awesome character. This woman had a core of steel in spite of how things appeared from the outside. I felt the chemistry was good between these two and I enjoyed their steamy scenes. The storyline and world these characters inhabit is very complicated and I do admit that sometimes things could get a bit confusing. Still, I found this to be a very entertaining read and I look forward to more from this series.
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    Highlander meets Hunger Games.

    Highlander meets Hunger Games. The All War continues in book two of Gena Showalter’s God of War series, Frost and Flame. This is Bane of Adwaeweth’s and Nola Lee’s story. The All War Alliance was formed by alien races to limit the casualties of war when fighting for recently discovered territories. When a new realm is discovered each race can enter one warrior to compete to win the realm for their race. It is a battle to the death. Only one survivor is allowed. This time they are fighting for Terra (aka Earth). I enjoyed Bane’s and Nola’s story. They both have interesting histories. Both characters have suffered in different ways. They are good for each other. They grow. They make the other stronger and have amazing chemistry. I appreciated how Knox of Iviland and Vale London (book #1) played a role in this story. Gena Showalter does a nice job with this novel. Frost and Flame is skillfully written. There are politics, deceit, adventure, and romance. There are interesting twists that kept me engaged throughout. I suggest reading book one, Shadow and Ice, first. I recommend this novel to people who enjoy paranormal fantasies like Highlander and the Hunger Games. This series would make an excellent television or movie series. I voluntarily reviewed an advance reader copy of this book.
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