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3.3 out of 5
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  • 1 person found this review helpful

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    Debut psychological thrill (being adapted to film)

    Have you ever wanted to be a tourist in someone else’s life? Just pretend to be someone else for a little while and escape your own everyday monotony? The main character in Only Daughter stumbled upon the perfect entryway for this situation and she thought it would solve all her problems. Only it just created more. Apparently, Only Daughter shares a similar plotline with many other novels, however the only similar one I have read is Sara Shepard's The Lying Game. Alternating time frames voiced by both the imposter and the missing girl slowly reveal what happened to a family's only daughter. I personally found it far-fetched that everyone involved in the missing girl's life accepted someone else and believed her identity so easily, even though many years had passed. I look at old photographs of family members and I would hope I couldn't be manipulated but I guess desperation and grief might make you believe just about anything to get some positive closure. Overall, I liked this debut and remained fairly engaged throughout. Although it didn't blow my mind, I would definitely pay the pricey $15 for a movie ticket when it comes to theaters. I think the plot line (and that ending) will play out very well on screen. If you enjoy the book-to-movie experience or if you have been keeping up with the influx of psychological thriller debuts, then check out Anna Snoekstra's Only Daughter.
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    Riveting

    It was just an impulse. Our narrator finds herself in trouble when caught shoplifting something only so she would have something to eat. If she gave her real name or was fingerprinted, they would know who she was and what she had done. She knew she looked like her, so before really thinking it through, she said "I'm Rebecca Winters and I was abducted 11 years ago". And then it was too late to take it back. Her plan was to escape in a few days but she got caught up in Bec's life. She was in a family, a family that seemed to adore her and the thought of taking over Bec's life seemed like a really good idea. But something is wrong. Maybe Bec's life wasn't all that golden. Someone is following her, someone is sending her texts. Who knew she wasn't the real Bec?"Her"mom seems a little off. She is having a hard time trying not to screw up and give herself away; to the parents, and the brothers, the best friend Lizzie and the policeman who handled her case. I had no idea where this was going and it was one thrilling ride getting there. What a fantastic plot line and conclusion, a total shock and surprise to me. The only reason I didn't give it a five was just a little of what i thought was unrealistic in her "return". No one really questioned anything about where she had been except Vince the cop. No one seemed to pick up on what had to be glaringly obvious, her mannerisms, her voice, no idea of anything in Bec's past so no way would she even be able to carry off being Bec. And also, someone would have leaked something to the press long before it actually happened. Still a solid 4 1/2 for me. Nonetheless, other than that, which didn't wreck the story for me, this book just grips you, I read most of it in one sitting. It is told by Bec before her disappearance and by "Bec" when she returns. We had an advantage knowing details of Bec's life that the imposter didn't know; things that if she had known, she never would have returned. Great read!
12

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