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  • One of my favorites

    When we met Nash in the last book I knew his story was going to be a must-read and it didn’t disappoint. Nash and Pru are very different from each other and exactly what each other needed. There’s heat between them from the moment they meet and she is determined to keep him from being sent away or worse. Their love proves beauty is deeper than what you see because both believed they were ugly and no one would want them. They brought out the best in each other and protected each other. Anyone around them could see the love and passion between them so it was no surprise when their passion leads to some problems that in the end helped them more. The peacock ties into everything and is a wonderful story. Pru is full of life, stories, and doesn’t give up on anything or anyone. Her personality will make you smile from the start with the song she is singing and how bouncy she is. She knew what Nash needed wasn’t pity or help, but to take care of himself and deal with what haunted him. Because of the scandal in Cairo, she knew more than other young women and didn’t hide her passion. Nash has shot a friend, locked himself away, and he fears he’ll hurt those he cares about. He used a gun to protect himself in more ways than one, but Pru made him lose the need for it. The more you learn about him the more you love him and you will be holding your breath when he must face his fears. The ending was absolutely perfect and left me holding my breath the whole time and then jumping up and down with what happened. Copy provided for an honest and voluntary review

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  • One of My Favs in the Survivors Series

    Prudence Howard is the daughter of missionaries and has traveled the world, but can’t seem to stay out of trouble, which is how she ends up staying with the local vicar while her parents are on another mission. She’s a pretty unusual young lady and is just what Nash Pope needs to get him out of his depression and drinking. He was a sharpshooter who lost his sight in the war and has been holed up in Wentmore, his father’s country estate, giving in to despair and memories of battle. His father, the Earl of Beaufort, is threatening to send Nash to an asylum, since he's dangerous to himself and others with the pistol he carries with him at all times, and in fact has shot one of his brothers-in arms (it was an accident when Duncan startled him and brought on a flashback). The earl sends one of his fellow soldiers, Rowden Payne to see if he can help and with the care of Rowden and Pru’s unconventional company, Nash starts to care about the world again. I really felt for Nash, who endured much in the war and carries it with him in the form of flashbacks and fear, especially since he’s lost his sight. Pru is just what he needs, and since she’s alone in the world with no friends or family nearby, she jumps at the chance to help Nash, especially since he’s the most handsome and interesting man she’s ever met. What a pair they make and she’ll never give up on him, no matter what, which gives him the courage to not give up on himself as well. Although I’ve enjoyed them all, this is one of my favorite books in the Survivors series, what a great story! I voluntarily read and reviewed an advanced copy of this book.

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  • What a Wonderful Tale - I loved Nash

    I have loved Shana Galen’s books since her very first one. She writes strong, complex characters – both male and female – along with compelling stories usually filled with an abundance of wit, romance, and excitement. In this story, she explores the after effects of the Peninsular Wars on one soldier who was wounded and lost his sight. Her descriptions of Melancholia and what is today known as PTSD make you feel those things, the fear, the dread, the despair, the anguish, right along with Nash. Nash Pope is the youngest son of an earl and a survivor of the Peninsular Wars. Nash is the most gifted sharpshooter England has ever seen – or at least he was. Now, he is a broken man, living in isolation, and expecting his father to have him hauled off to an asylum at any moment. He can’t help it. The lives he took, the mistakes he made, haunt him constantly and threaten to drag him down into a deep, dark abyss and maybe never let him out. Any unexpected noise, any unexpected approach, throws him right back into those horrific scenes from the war with the enemy approaching from all sides. He lives all alone in a dark world where the slightest thing causes fear and an immediate defensive reaction from him. He even shot one of his friends a few months ago when the friend unexpectedly arrived at his door (The Highlanders Excellent Adventure). Nash served as part of a troop that was deemed to be expendable. The elite troop was made up of thirty younger sons of the nobility who were assigned to the most dangerous and deadly missions in the war. Only twelve returned and they became known as Draven’s Dozen. Those twelve men all had survivor’s guilt of one sort or another and all of them had seen and done things that would curl the toes of most men. Those men, those survivors, are still looking out for each other even after the wars have ended. They know Nash is on the cusp of being confined and send one of their own, Rowden Payne to intervene and begin to straighten Nash up. Rowden is the perfect one to begin to put Nash on the road toward some normalcy in his life. Rowden is huge, brusque, no-nonsense, and just what Nash needs. Prudence Howard – you are going to LOVE her – is the twenty-three-year-old daughter of zealot missionaries. Because of an unfortunate incident in Cairo, her parents have dumped her off in the care of Vicar Higginbotham, in the village of Milcroft. Pru is sunny, happy, kind, patient, non-judgmental, calm, and … surprising. Pru is definitely NOT your typical daughter of missionaries – she tries very, very hard to be good, she’s just not very good at being good. If she thinks it – she says it. If she feels it, she usually says it. She’s very much Polyanna and everybody who meets her loves her – well, except maybe her parents. Pru’s whole outlook on life and what is around her is different than most – more nuanced, more focused. Where one person would see a grassy field, Pru sees and delights in the different colors of the grasses, the flowers that are there, the small animals. Pru loves to walk through the countryside when she can escape the vicarage and one day while walking – and singing a bawdy tune at the top of her lungs – she sees a young handsome man who is stuck in the mud and trying to get up the embankment. Of course, Pru being Pru, she offers her assistance. When he is short and brusque with her, she just ignores it and continues on with trying to help him. Their relationship goes in much that same manner until – surprise – they are in love. I loved watching Nash begin to come to terms with his blindness and his PTSD – and to learn to deal with them. The help he needed was a long time in coming, but when it arrived, it was exactly the right help. Maybe it was even the right time for that help as well, because he probably wouldn’t have been ready for it earlier. Pru, Rowden, and Nash’s new valet, Clopdon, are exactly who he needed in his life and I love how he learned to accept that help without resentment. After the last book, I didn’t see how this author was going to redeem Nash. Not only did she redeem him, she made him one of the best heroes. We get to see Nash go from contemplating suicide to his HEA because of the lovely, lovely people around him – and his genuine desire to come back to the land of the living. I definitely recommend this book – and all of the other books in the series. I hope you’ll read it and enjoy it as much as I did. Since we saw so much of Rowden in this book, I’m thinking he might just get the feature role in the next book. Since I really liked him, I can’t wait. I voluntarily read and reviewed an Advanced Reader Copy of this book. All thoughts and opinions are my own.

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  • The best so far! Accepting yourself as you are

    I voluntarily read an Advanced Reader Copy of Sweet Rogue of Mine and the views expressed are my honest opinions. In the Ninth Book of the Survivor Series, we get to know more about Nash Pope, the sharpshooter of among the dozen who survived the war but lost his sight in the process. We had first met Nash in Book 8, when he shot a fellow survivor for entering his home and since then, it was apparent that Nash still carried a lot of baggage from the battlefield. Nash, a younger son of the Earl of Beaufort, is living alone at Wentmore, his father’s isolated and neglected country home with his pistols always at hand. With no staff except the occasional visit from Mrs. Brown and her less than palatable food, Nash was wasting away on a diet of hard spirits and depression. Until Rowden Payne, a fellow survivor puts his foot down and forces some changes into Nash’s life in order to avoid being locked away in a mental asylum by his father. Trying to escape Rowden’s heavy hand, Nash finds himself in the estate’s garden one day and is piqued by the enthusiastic bawdy singing of a young woman. Prudence Howard, the owner of the voice is the daughter of missionaries who has been palmed off upon the vicar at Milcroft, the small village closest to the estate, following a scandal oversees. Pru is immediately intrigued by the handsome soldier, even more so once she sets her mind to help give him purpose and teach him night writing. This book is one of Shana Galen’s best works. While all of Shana’s character’s are larger-than-life, Nash and Pru are hardly the conventional hero and heroine. Pru is portrayed as far from perfect and having numerous flaws; she is not the most beautiful, finds it difficult to be obedient and impulsive. Nash is portrayed as a soldier suffering from PTSD in great detail. While in reality, Nash was the furthest from the combat most of the time, psychologically, he suffered just as much as his fellow Survivors. This suffering is even more intensified with the loss of his sight, making him even more stuck in a world of his own. Shana Galen’s books usually include short humorous scenes which are somewhat lacking in this book. However, I believe that this is for the best as it made the story more sentimental. Instead, there are a number of secondary characters who recognize Pru’s worth and provide her with support, even in gruff, unusual ways. Added to this is the symbolism of the peacocks who inhabited Wentmore and Pru’s fascination with them. Oftentimes, when an author writes a series, it can be difficult to maintain the reader’s interest. However, this is definitely not a problem for Shana Galen. The writing style of the book reminds me of Mary Balogh. Ms. Galen whets the readers’ appetites by establishing Rowden as the next hero of her book and keeps us wondering about his story. I highly recommend this book – a must read.

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  • Sweet Rogue of Mine

    Sweet Rogue of Mine is the ninth book in The Survivors Series. This has been such an amazing series and this book continues the trend. The series is based on a group of soldiers during the Napoleonic war called the Survivors. They were a team of soldiers that Lieutenant Colonel Benedict Daven (from the fifth book in the series) was ordered to put together that took on suicide missions. There were thirty men in the group but only twelve made it back to England alive. The books can be read as standalone but it’s such a great series that you will want to read them all. Nash Pope had lost his sight on the battlefield. As a sniper for the military, losing his sight devastated him. He has not been able to resume a normal life after returning to London. Certain triggers send him back to the battlefields and the memories haunt him. The Earl of Beaufort, his father sent him to Wentmore, the family’s country house, to hopefully recover. When Beaufort threatens to send Nash to an asylum, one of the Survivors is sent to help get Nash straightened out. Prudence Howard had traveled with her missionary parents her entire life until she created a scandal in Cairo. They brought her to England and then left her with the vicar in the small town of Milcroft. She tries to behave and not cause trouble, but trouble seems to follow her. Meeting Nash set off her curious mind and she’s intrigued by him. When she hears about his father’s threats of sending him to an asylum she’s determined to help him. I was so glad to finally read Nash’s story. We saw him in the previous books and his bitterness and anger made him lash out at his brothers-in-arms. The book captured my attention in the beginning and I could not stop reading until the end. It draws you in and you feel like you are part of the story. The characters were charming and they were perfect for each other. As always with this series, I can’t wait for the next book! I received an ARC and am willingly leaving a review. All thoughts and opinions are my own.

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