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    The bone clocks

    I enjoyed this book thoroughly, it was longer and more serious than his others but great none the less.
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    Far From a Page Turner

    This review was originally published on Kurt's Frontier. Synopsis: Holly Sykes is a 15-year-old who is sensitive to psychic phenomenon. She hears voices only of someone she calls “the radio people.” After a terrible argument with her mother, she storms out of the house, triggering the start of an adventure that will last her entire lifetime. She has come to the attention of dangerous mystics, and their enemies who seek to protect her. The loss of her eccentric younger brother scars her family and affects everyone Holly’s life touches. Review: There are many interesting elements in The Bone Clocks. David Mitchell deals with a rich tapestry of psychic powers. It is a story of psychic predators and those who seek to stop them. Caught up in this centuries long war is a young girl with psychic powers of her own. Her running a way triggers a series of events that scar her and influence the rest of her life. The book uses the first person point of view. However, the book makes huge jumps in time and constantly shifts points of view. While there are a few gripping comments, much of the book is long exposition and far from a page turner. The author makes use of flashbacks which further arrests the forward progress of the story.
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