Skip to main content

Recommended For You

Loading...

Shopping Cart

You're getting the VIP treatment!

Item(s) unavailable for purchase
Please review your cart. You can remove the unavailable item(s) now or we'll automatically remove it at Checkout.
itemsitem
itemsitem

Ratings and Book Reviews ()

Overall rating

4.5 out of 5
5 Stars
95 reviews have 5 stars
4 Stars
45 reviews have 4 stars
3 Stars
8 reviews have 3 stars
2 Stars
3 reviews have 2 stars
1 Star
1 reviews have 1 stars

Share your thoughts

You've already shared your review for this item. Thanks!

We are currently reviewing your submission. Thanks!

Complete your review

All Book Reviews

  • a forgotten history unearthed

    Heartwrenching and beautiful, this story touched on so many emotions. Parallel stories in post-Civil War south and a young teacher in the 80s.  We follow three young women looking for family and property deeds and legal papers. During the search, they find themselves in danger and not knowing whom to trust. Along the way, they discover "Lost Friends" posts in papers and document many former enslaved people searching for family. Finding family and uncovering truths leads to many secrets. A young teacher, thrust into a classroom where children segregate themselves by class and color, tries to find a way to engage them with limited resources, children forgotten with lack of funding. Her project to get the children interested in their community, the past, and history, stirs up the surrounding area. What they uncover will forever change many and connect the dots to a part of history some would prefer to ignore. Hannie and Benny show us history cannot be swept away. This book serves to open eyes, hearts, and minds with understanding while educating us on a forgotten history in our country. May the stories not be forgotten, the names not left unuttered. **received an ARC from the publisher** 

    Thanks for your feedback!

    4 person found this review helpful

    4 people found this review helpful

    4 of 4 people found this review helpful

  • Fantastic read!

    This is another unputdownable page-turner by author Lisa Wingate. I absolutely loved this book that was rich in history from the Reconstruction era which featured freed slave 18-year-old Hannie Gossett who ends up on a journey to Texas with pampered plantation heirs Lavina and her Creole half-sister Juneau Jane in search of what happened to their inheritance in 1875 Agusta, Louisiana. This story alternates with 1987 Louisiana and English teacher Benedetta "Benny Silva who comes to Agusta, LA in search of a job that will erase her student loans. Benny's students range from 7th through 12th grade and most of them are not interested in learning. It is a struggle to get them to learn until she stumbles upon an idea to get them interested in doing research on the people who are buried in the old cemetery behind her rented house and the plantation owners. The Gossett family who still live and pretty much own the town do everything they can to stop her from her students' project. Thank you NetGalley and Ballantine Books for the ARC of this fantastic book in exchange for an honest review.

    Thanks for your feedback!

    1 person found this review helpful

    1 people found this review helpful

    1 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • Enthralling Family Saga About US History of Racism

    THE BOOK OF LOST FRIENDS is a family saga about black and white relationships and connections in post Civil War America, that also connects with people living in the same area a hundred years later. Extremely engaging! What ties everyone together is their connection to an old plantation at Goswood Grove in the small town of Augustine, Louisiana: • One part of the story takes place in 1875. Slavery has ended though the lives of former enslaved people have changed little. With vastly different motivations, three brave women from the plantation must embark on a challenging trip to the Texas frontier, to find some important legal papers relating to the heir to the property. They are NOT friends, though they have longstanding ties. How do three women travel safely over such a long distance? How do they figure out who among the many people they encounter can be trusted? And do they have the smarts to even get to their destination? And how will their relationships with one another evolve? • A second part of the story involves young teacher Benedeta Silva, just beginning her teaching career in a very poor, small town public school with few resources and distinctly unmotivated students. How can she possibly figure out a way to engage them in their school work? Would accessing the vast library at Goswood Grove help? Can she expect, as an outsider, to ever be accepted into this tightly knit society of haves and have nots? And why is there such resistance to her enthusiasm around helping her students? I have written in other reviews about my annoyance at what I consider a much overused device in contemporary historical fiction — i.e. authors writing multiple storylines that move back and forth in time and only connect at the very end of the book. So often, the technique seems to do little more than add confusion. But this is one novel where Lisa Wingate skillfully employs that very device. AND it makes sense. Her two story threads are easy to follow and clearly connected by the US history of slavery, which continues to impact all of us today. Central to that connection is a fascinating publication I knew nothing about —the “lost friends” ads that were placed in a Methodist newspaper, The Southwestern Advocate. For decades, placing ads in this publication (which were then read aloud during church services) was one of the only ways former enslaved people had to try to locate family members who had been sold off years before, during the period of slavery. And actual excerpts that the author sprinkles throughout the novel are both dramatic and powerful, offering a glimpse into the pain and desperation so many black Americans experienced.

    Thanks for your feedback!

    1 person found this review helpful

    1 people found this review helpful

    1 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • A must read for history buffs

    Lisa Wingate has written another masterpiece. In her new book, “The Book of Lost Friends” she brings to life the stories of two women a hundred years apart, yet so close that they merge into one. Hannie and Benny are masterfully brought together as they search for identity by looking at pasts that are filled with pain, desperation, separation and insecurities. Their dysfunctional lives find hope in their relentless pursuit for “lost friends”. The two lives converge in a story that will have you crying, laughing and reflecting on the importance of family legacies and traditions. I lived their lives in my mind as if watching a movie. Lisa’s descriptive writing and her historical knowledge brings the characters alive like no one can. She brings back to life those long lost histories that need to be retold. To borrow from a line in the story “if there is magic in this world, it’s contained in books”. This is definitely a magical heartbreaking and also encouraging work that will stay with you for a very long time. Five stars ⭐️ and more.

    Thanks for your feedback!

    0 person found this review helpful

    0 people found this review helpful

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful

  • intriguing title

    excellent story telling of these slave years through the historical lives of the characters from past to present. The author carries you away on a journey of perseverence and courage with a clear challenge to face your own fears with truth and committment to love unconditionally.

    Thanks for your feedback!

    0 person found this review helpful

    0 people found this review helpful

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful

You can read this item using any of the following Kobo apps and devices:

  • DESKTOP
  • eREADERS
  • IOS
  • ANDROID
  • TABLETS