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    Weak arguments

    As someone who stands firm in his Christian faith, I looked to this book with hope that it would provide some solid and, previously unknown, historical details to me about the life of Jesus that would strengthen my faith. This didn't happen. Another reviewer commented that the author has setup a 300+page strawman, and I must agree with that. Lee Strobel introduces six questions (arguments) posed by historians that question the divinity and legitimacy of Jesus as messiah. He does so by quoting the works of historians that pertain to each of these topics, then he interviews historians who hold the opposing (his) worldview, and allows them to pick apart the validity of the counterarguments. Being a Christian, it probably ought to have been easy for Strobel to sway me, but his "case" was just plain weak, and his argument did nothing for me. This book boiled down to a bunch of historians on opposite sides of the Jesus debate attempting to discredit the each other, while we lay people wonder to ourselves, "What the heck are they talking about?" Strobel mentions that there is Greek word for a young woman that has 16 different translations. Because of this, some historians conclude that Mary was not a Virgin when she gave birth to Jesus. Whose translation is correct? At another point, a historian is discredited because his opinions are based on a Greek translation of text. This historian was unable to read the original Aramaic text which, according to Strobel, would have offered a different perspective on what the document contained. What each of us believes when it comes to God and religion is ultimately a question of faith. I'm not sure any historian/archeologist will ever be able to uncover enough suitable evidence to prove, beyond a shadow of a doubt, the events of the life of Jesus over 2000 years ago. It just comes down to faith.
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