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Ratings and Book Reviews (3 4 star ratings
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    You can't put it down!

    I wish I could give this book more than five stars! The author reels you into the story right from the beginning. A woman having lost her purse, id and everything that could be used to identify her arrives at what she believes to be her home. Unfortunately she has no idea of who she is, only that the house she is trying to enter is her home. This is the beginning of a mysterious story in which the characters are well developed and will keep you guessing until the end. The author drops many bread crumbs along the way, but if you think you know the story you are wrong. Every time I tried to put it down, something happened and I had to read it straight through. Although new to me, I look forward to reading more from this author.
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    Psychological thriller - amnesia with a twist

    The Last Thing She Remembers by J.S. Monroe is a psychological thriller. First, let me thank NetGalley, the publisher Harlequin – Park Row, and of course the author, for providing me with a copy of this book in exchange for an honest review. All opinions are my own.   My Synopsis:   (No major reveals, but if concerned, skip to My Opinions) When a woman knocks on the door of Tony and Laura Masters house in a small village outside of London, no one is more surprised than they are when they invite this stranger in and tell her she can stay. They don’t know her, and she doesn’t know them. She also doesn’t know herself. The only thing she can tell them is that she arrived at the airport from a business trip to Berlin, and lost her purse. She doesn’t know her own name, has no ID, but she is sure that their house is actually hers. She can even describe the lay-out before she is shown around. A trip to the doctor’s office seems to confirm that she has amnesia. Her arrival in this small village has brought out all the theorists. Dr. Patterson is the first to think the woman may be Jemma Huish, a young woman from town who had slashed her room-mate’s throat after warning the police she wanted to murder someone. No one stopped her. Jemma ended up in a mental institution, and was eventually rehabilitated, but is currently missing. Laura Masters, once willing to welcome the woman in to her home, no longer feels safe. Her husband insists that the woman is not Jemma (although he was the one that suggested they call her that).  Tony is, however, very interested in her amnesia. Sean at the bar is sure she is a Russian spy. Luke thinks she may be his daughter. Hopefully the police will be able to solve this mystery. Unfortunately, the woman seems to have her own agenda, and doesn’t want to co-operate.   My Opinions: This is the first book I have read by this author, and I know he has written a couple of others. I’ll have to check my library, because they’ll be moving up my TBR list. I loved this book.  It isn't just another "woman with amnesia" book. It grabbed my attention from the first few pages, and I struggled to put it down. The writing is clear and concise, the plot interesting, and the twists surprising. I love a book that has me doubting the reliability of a number of characters. What more could I want? Well....there may have been a little much going on, and about half way through I thought it was a good place to end, until I realized that the author had more surprises in store. So it may have been a little long, and stretched the believability quotient a little, but I didn’t really care too much. I enjoyed it.
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    The Last Thing She Remembers

    To me The Last Thing She Remembers (J. S. Monroe) starts slow. I had a difficult time for quite awhile reading The Last Thing She Remembers due to the author constantly switching from first person point of view to (what I would call) observer-narrator. I was given an early copy to review.
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