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Ratings and Book Reviews (4 21 star ratings
4 reviews
)

Overall rating

4.1 out of 5
21
5 Stars 4 Stars 3 Stars 2 Stars 1 Star
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  • 3 person found this review helpful

    3 people found this review helpful

    3 of 3 people found this review helpful

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    Wonderful read

    Thank you Netgalley and Harlequin/Park Row Publishing for allowing me to read this book for a review. I wanted to read this book based on the title alone. It wasn't what I was expecting it was a whole lot more! Martha Storm volunteers at her local library, hoping to one day work there. She spends her days agreeing to do favours for everyone around her, forgetting to live her own life. As a child, Martha used to write stories, and one day a mysterious book shows up that shakes up her whole life....I LOVED this story! It struck a chord with me, and Martha was a character I wanted to read about. All the characters came alive for me while I was reading. The only small disappointment was I thought it ended abruptly.
  • 1 person found this review helpful

    1 people found this review helpful

    1 of 1 people found this review helpful

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    A story about letting go of the past

    The Library of Lost and Found is not what I expected from the book description. Martha Storm is a woman in her 40s (we are not given her exact age) who cannot say no. It seems that all the locals take advantage of Martha by unloading various tasks they do not wish to do on her (fixing papier mache dragon head for school, cleaning chandeliers, doing Nora’s endless bags of laundry because her machine is broken, storing items, fish sitting, hemming her nephew’s pants) for which she gets nothing in return (rarely even a thank you). It does not help that Martha feels unworthy thanks to her father and his controlling nature. The story also takes us back to Betty Storm, Martha’s mother, and her life with Thomas Storm. We see how Zelda affected their lives and finally what happened to Zelda. The special book left for Martha is what prompts change in Martha’s life. We follow Martha’s journey for the truth. While others may see The Library of Lost and Found as a feel good story, I found it depressing. The author is a verbose descriptive writer (i.e.—long winded and detailed) which leads to a slow paced story. There is a slight uptick in the pace towards the end of the book. I thought it was a predictable story, and I wanted something more. Two phrases I liked from the book are “I take each page and chapter as they come” which is from Zelda and the other is “You should always make time for books” (very true) from Owen. Owen wore a shirt that had “Booksellers—great between the sheets” on the front (makes me smile). For readers who like to read women’s lit, you will find this story appealing. The Story of Lost and Found is about letting go of the past so you can move forward towards a brighter future.
  • 0 person found this review helpful

    0 people found this review helpful

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    book about family and forgiveness

    An unknown person leaves the main character, Martha, a book on the library's doorstep. The book contains stories she wrote as a child and is authored by her grandmother that died 3 years before the book was published. Martha follows the book's trail to discover her family's secrets. I almost stopped reading this book because the main character allowed everyone to take advantage of her and mistreat her. I find it hard to read stories about people who have such low self-worth that they don't stand up for themselves. However, I stuck with it because I liked the premise of the story and Martha begins to heal and grow as the book develops. A good story about family, acceptance, and forgiveness.
  • 0 person found this review helpful

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    Great read

    Great character development. Interesting plot line. Satisfying conclusion. Everything needed to make a great read.
21

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