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Ratings and Reviews (5 17 star ratings
5 reviews
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4.6 out of 5
17
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  • 1 person found this review helpful

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    The Lost Letter Was Not Lost On Me!

    Kristoff has found a home, finally. Having been abandoned as a young child, finding his way as an adult has proved difficult. He finds refuge as an apprentice in the home of well-known stamp engraver, Frederick Faber. Frederick and his family, a wife and two daughters, are Jewish and living in Austria. However, as winter begins to invade, so do the Nazis, tearing Kristoff's new family apart. In another time and place, (California, 1989 to be precise) another family is tearing at the seams. Kate is struggling at work because her co-worker is her soon to be ex-husband. He filed the papers, she just needs to sign them. She is also juggling that with her father, Ted, a formerly avid stamp collector who has Alzheimer's. She meets Benjamin, a philatelist, to get her father's stamp collection appraised and one stamp in particular sends them on an adventure. Although the plot jumped between the two stories, I thought it was done seamlessly. There were some chapters, however, where I wish it had not jumped because I was too eager to find out what happens next in one setting. It had several twists and turns, as well as several times where my heart ached for the characters. Although romance stories from World War II have been done quite often, this one stands out as unique. It brings elements of stamp engraving as well as collecting that I have yet to read elsewhere. Furthermore, the romance is a subtle build that is often cast aside in the urgency of the war period time frame. The characters are not begging for attention nor are they over dramatic in responses. This is true for the stories in both time periods. I do recommend this book for those who enjoy historical fiction, a bit of adventure, and romance. I read through it quickly as I found it to be gripping at times and heart-wrenching at other times. For those who may be offended: there was kidnapping, guns, and sexually suggestive scenarios. Please note: an electronic copy of this book was generously provided for free from Penguin's First To Read program in exchange for an honest review.
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    The Lost Letter

    Excellently written. I enjoyed every minute of it. Couldn't put it down.
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    A story of enduring love during turbulent times

    "The Lost Letter" is a Holocaust story which flips back and forth between 1938 Austria and 1990 Los Angeles. In 1938 a young Austrian named Kristoff works as an apprentice to a Jewish stamp engraver. He is taken in by the engraver's family and becomes close to him, his wife and their two teenaged daughters. The Nazi occupation of Austria puts their lives in peril. The younger daughter Miri travels to Britain on a Kindertransport, but Kristoff and the older daughter Elena remain in Austria and work for the resistance movement. Elena and Kristoff fall in love but are separated by circumstances. In 1990's Los Angeles, Katie, a young woman whose father has Alzheimer's, decides to have her father's stamp collection appraised. Questions arise about the collection, and Katie and Benjamin, the appraiser, undertake to find out what happened to the stamp engraver. What they discover is a revelation to them and gives credence to the power of enduring love. I found this story familiar as I have read numerous Holocaust novels and recollections.That said, I enjoyed this novel and found it difficult to put down.
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    The lost Letter

    I really enjoyed reading this book. I believe I have already sent in a review from my I Pad. I have recommend it to my book club. It should garner a lot of discussion.
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    Love

    A beautiful story with an ending I did not expect. I would love to see this as a movie.
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