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  • young, women loving women finding their way

    I really, really like this book. Four and a half stars. At first I felt like I was reading an updated, lesbian version of the Brat Pack novels of the 1980s. Everyone was drinking a lot and doing a moderate amount of drugs and almost everyone was having quite a bit of sex and none of it seemed to mean very much. But the more I read, the more it started meaning. The shallow hookups were still shallow hookups but the book itself is about deeper questions. What is a love story, really? How do you figure out who you are and what want and who you're going to be? At a certain point near the end of the book, it struck me that the title echoes The Love Song of J. Alfred Prufrock, and the narrator, Andie, is trying to figure out whether she's a Prufrock, who the mermaids will never sing for, or if she just hasn't found her story yet. The book also deals with some aspects of what it means to love and support someone with a chronic health condition, though chronic illness is not as central to the book as it is to Moskowitz's Sick Kids in Love. This book reminded me powerfully of what it's like to be young and trying to answer all those questions and also what it's like to go through life powerfully drawn to someone who is never going to want you the way you want them. It's got a lot of big feelings and I get very invested in how things were going to work out for the three central characters. It doesn't finish with a big happy every after, but I did find myself quietly satisfied. Many thanks to NetGalley and Entangled Teen for the opportunity to read an advance copy of this book. All thoughts and opinions are my own. (By the way, the imprint is Entangled Teen, but I definitely class this as a New Adult novel, not Young Adult.)

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  • Cute contemporary romance

    "Love Song should be dedicated to all those who've idolized their first crush, taken a drunken leap of faith, and admitted their feelings only to have them brutally shred your imaginary love story because they've known about your feelings all along and do not reciprocate" Ever feel like a book should come with a warning label because it hits right in the feels? Love Song touches such an intimate part of life, that awkward phase where you're stuck in a rut with no clear direction and you begin to question your life decisions while fighting the overwhelming feeling of being lost and empty. "What are you supposed to do when it turns out nothing is what you thought it was and everything you'd been planning is totally for nothing." Andie was such a hot relateable mess as she self sabotages all her potential relationships. It was equal parts painful and insightful watching her try to move on but being unable to because of her unrequited love for Ivy. Ivy was such an interesting character to me because I feel like everyone has someone like her in their life. They are too cool almost to the point of untouchable, incredibly selfish, and self-centered but you love them anyway and couldn't picture your life without them. Love Song features: Behind the scenes of a strip club Lesbian/ polyamory relationships An emotionally bereft main character Dynamic and comedic girl squad Love Song at its core is about powering through rejection, despite how hurtful it may be and not being afraid to take chances. It forces readers to digest an uncomfortable truth- as much as you may have your heart set on someone, love is a two-way street. Another powerful takeaway from Love Song is the reality that not everyone finds a grand love story like the ones written in books, sometimes life deals you some pretty shitty cards and you realize, maybe it’s ok not to fall in love? Thank you to the author, Entangled Publishing, and NetGalley for providing me with an arc. Trigger Warning: There are scenes depicting alcohol consumption, drug use, and overdose.

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  • Messy, Complicated, and Fabulous

    trigger warnings: implied emotional abuse, parental abandonment, fire, alcohol, heavy drug use, panic attacks, hospitals Before I begin this review, I want to clarify for anyone who was interested in this book, that it is NOT a lighthearted rom-com, instead, it's an angsty YA-contemporary. This isn't the first Hannah Moskowitz book that I read and I believe that this is relevant information. If you don't like the kind of unlikeable, messy characters that Moskowitz likes to write or their more crass and edgy style, or their very sex-positive themes, or their more dramatic plots, then this book probably isn't for you. If you, however, like me, enjoy a lot of what they have to offer, The Love Song of Ivy K. Harlowe will not disappoint you. Moskowitz is an absolute master when it comes to character voice and character development, not only with the protagonists but with the side characters as well and it is, I believe, the point where their craft shines the brightest. They're not afraid to show people as they truly are, a little messy, a little lost, a little broken, but still good. It's also where their penchant for edginess actually also does them a service - it gives them a blunt edge to discuss them honestly without pulling any punches. Andie, the main character, will frustrate a lot of readers. For most of the book she's nursing a very hopeless crush on her completely unavailable best friend, Ivy. She angsts about that a lot, is completely obsessed with Ivy, and gets jealous even as she herself is in a relationship with another girl (which is a whole other mess). I loved Andie. She was written in a way where even in places where I couldn't relate to her (and don'T get me wrong, I did relate to her a lot of the time!), I could still understand her. Also, she's a lesbian who identifies as such explicitly in the text - and so does Ivy. Speaking of which - Ivy is the person who the book almost focuses on more than Andie which I thought was really interesting. We see her develop and grow and have a really cute and believable romance - not through her own perspective but filtered through the eyes of her best friend, which added a whole other thematic dimension to this book and made it even better. I also really liked Ivys love interest, Dot, who was absolutely adorable. In the first half, I thought she seemed a bit of a manic pixie dream girl character, but slowly, throughout the book, she very much comes into her own and gets developed as her own person, gaining a lot of depth and dimension. My only complaint about the book comes in relatively late. There's an event in the third act that I won't spoil here, and it's followed by a timeskip, where I could've actually liked to see the immediate repercussions of it, especially from an emotional perspective. On the whole, I wholeheartedly recommend this book.

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  • Bingeable New Adult With Sapphic Crew

    a bingeable new adult book, with queer women trying to find themselves and their place, and navigating life and new adulthood i thought it was going to be a low rating for the first half. however, i enjoyed the directions it took and the conversations it has at the end deeply resonated with me. I really enjoyed the cast of only queer women (with the exception of parents). The characters are not loveable and their relationships are unhealthy at first, but their arcs do get them there (at least for the main characters). The representation of disability and the discussions of monogamy/non-monogamy was well-done and felt refreshing to read a different type of love story. The story slowly delves into conversations on finding your path, both in life and love, and how that is different for different people or happens at different times, which i think will resonate with many people! I voluntarily read and reviewed an advanced copy of this book. All thoughts and opinions are my own.

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  • I’m in love

    Thank you to NetGalley and Entangled Publishing for the arc of this book. All opinions are my own. When Hannah described this as the great lesbian love story, I was immediately sold. That’s exactly what it was. I fell absolutely in love with Ivy and Andie. What a beautiful journey about growth, love and learning what your limits are. This book follows Andie as she tries to grapple with her feelings for Ivy and still live her life. When Dot comes on the scene Andie must deal with the fall out as she doesn’t just leave after her night with Ivy. What starts as one story you think is going to happen blooms into something completely different. The journey that Andie goes on throughout this book is such a beautiful mix of self discovery and messy problems. I loved every second of this. It’s such a great story and one that should be told. That life may not always be this grand love story or adventure. You can find yourself in the most obscure places, even when you don’t want to find yourself at all. Ivy. Oh Ivy. What a joy to watch Ivy transform as well. It was fun and fluid and her relationship with Dot was so cute!! I loved it. It wasn’t this picture perfect thing but it worked for them and that’s so important. Not everything is made the way society wants, but it can still work and that’s how these two were. It was fantastic. I loved the core group of friends and their ability to be there for one another. Andie’s parents were also incredible. It was like this little found family, mixed with an incredible friend group and growing up. What a book. So, so good!

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