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Overall rating

4.1 out of 5
(63)
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  • 6 person found this review helpful

    6 people found this review helpful

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    Loved this trilogy.

    While this may not be a perfect trilogy, I couldn’t give it anything less than a perfect rating for so many reasons, but I’ll start with: its ending, that absolutely perfect ending which brought tears (real tears!) to my eyes. Grossman has also done something incredibly impressive with Quentin throughout this trilogy: he’s masterfully grown this character from someone you don’t like very much to someone you are genuinely grateful to have in your life. I enjoyed every moment with Quentin in the last book, and I’ll miss him very, very much. That being said, I already know I’ll re-read this series whenever I need a pick-me-up, in exactly the same way I do the Harry Potter books or the His Dark Materials trilogy or Ella Enchanted or Narnia or Tolkien… the list (thankfully) goes on. Grossman’s trilogy has moved into the same space in my heart that I keep the books that melt away the world and take me to a place filled with magic and adventure, and most importantly of all, hope. When I read books like these, everything is just better. The stories simply make me happy, and what’s so wonderful about Grossman’s work is that he never hesitates to acknowledge the magic that these books — a list which now most definitely includes The Magicians trilogy, too — have for a reader. Books that have the power to make you happy, hopeful, and (if you’re very lucky) a wiser, more empathetic and imaginative human being, really, truly, are magic. To sum up how I feel about The Magicians trilogy, I'm going to quote a far better writer than I could ever hope to be, Edan Lepucki: 'It’s in stories that we find ourselves. It makes sense, then, that as a boy, Quentin Coldwater read a series of books that led him into a life of magic. He fell in love with those books. I know the feeling.'

  • 1 person found this review helpful

    1 people found this review helpful

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    research would have helped.

    I got through the first chapter. It had all the earmarks of something I could like, but when I reached "Inuit reservation in Saskatchewan," that was the last straw. I could not make it any further. My sense of disbelief went boing, having spent a few years (most) of my life in Saskatchwan.

  • 0 person found this review helpful

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    Written just for me . . .

    It's rare when a book just totally understands you, when it's like going home or meeting an old friend. Thanks.

  • 2 person found this review helpful

    2 people found this review helpful

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    Are you kidding me?

    The paralells of this book at the tales of C.S. Lewis is massive - one the author makes fun of and has spoken about in interviews. But honestly, the tale falls drastically short. The prose is lacking vision, the main character is a total asshole (and not even a "Redeeming Asshole" - just a plain, unwiped, smelly asshole), the 1st part of the novel makes you feel like the author couldn't quite decide WHAT rules of magic he was going for in his "world," but by the 2nd half, you know that he's thrown it all out the window and is trying to get us interested in these lackluster characters who fall short of the words cost to print their description. Overall, read it if you want to waste your time. It has no redeeming qualities. Pick up Margaret Atwood for some real prose and character, or maybe just re-read The Lion, The Witch and The Wardrobe - but maybe start with The Magician's Nephew if you really want a good "trilogy" starter.

  • 0 person found this review helpful

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    So clos to perfection

    You know a book (or a trilogy) in this case is great when you feel empty and lost the dreaded moment when you finish it. It is the case with this book. This is pure genius.

(63)

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