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Ratings and Reviews (5 60 star ratings
5 reviews
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Overall rating

4.0 out of 5
60
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  • 2 person found this review helpful

    2 people found this review helpful

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    Interesting and well researched historical fiction

    It wasn’t until I reached the end of the book that I learned that McCoy’s character Sarah Brown was in fact a real woman. Although this is a fictional account of the abolitionist’s life, it shows a great deal of research done by the author. In the beginning I found Sarah’s storyline to be rushed and skipped ahead, leaving out some background detail. I also admit it took me some time to get into this story and to warm up to Eden. However the beautiful writing and my curiosity of how the two characters would connect, kept me reading. I would recommend The Mapmaker’s Children to those who are interested in reading about the abolitionist movements and the Underground Railroad. Note: I was sent a copy of The Mapmaker's Children by Sarah' McCoy from the publisher and The TLC Book Tours in exchange for an honest review.
  • 2 person found this review helpful

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    the mapmaker's children

    so interesting learning history in the way Sarah has written. the sadness of the time is there but the love of families involved in the story keeps you reading and wishing you belonged in their closeness.
  • 2 person found this review helpful

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    Maps & CriKet BisKets

    The Mapmaker's Children has moments in it that make you want to cry, others that make you mad, and more that make you happy. It is the twisting of two intertwined stories, Sarah Brown's one of the 1850's past & Eden's one of contemporary time. The two go into a lot of detail & you feel like you are right there in the story with them. Then they are all tied in together. Sarah McCoy really sets it all up well. Sarah's family is involved in the UnderGround RailRoad, at a time when it was not safe to do so. Sarah's father John is caught, convicted and killed for his role in helping slaves escape. Sarah is an artist who makes maps for the fugitive slaves to follow. Since most cannot read, she makes simple pictures of the routes to take. Eden is caught up in a lot of turmoil, because she has always wanted a baby & has undergone fertility treatments & hormones and her life is a mess. Her husband loves her, so things will be okay, if she can get past wanting a child.
  • 0 person found this review helpful

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    The Mapmakers Children

    Liked the contrast of historical situations to modern situations and the connection between them, especially in the details. An uplifting book even though the subject could be difficult.
  • 0 person found this review helpful

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    The Mapmaker's Children is an intriguing novel!

    I just finished reading The Mapmaker’s Children by Sarah McCoy. Eden Anderson and her husband, Jack have been trying to have a child for seven years (I am surprised they are still married). Eden has gotten pregnant twice, but she miscarried each time. After the second miscarriage, Eden has retreated into herself and withdrawn from life. They have moved to New Charleston, West Virginia and are living in an old home on Apple Hill Lane. One night Jack brings home a little dog. Eden does not want a dog to be a substitute for a child. But Cricket soon wrangles his way into her heart. Then Eden meets Cleo Bronner. Cleo is the granddaughter of the Mr. Bronner who is the banker. Cleo is being raised by her grandfather. Jack hired Cleo to take care of Cricket while he is out of town on business. Cleo brings home the Holistic Hound cookbook for them to try. One day Eden discovers a trap door in their pantry. When she opens it, she finds small root cellar. Big enough to hold people. Eden discovers a china doll head inside. Cleo and Eden set out to find out more information. Eden also wants to find out if the house can be listed on the historic register. Sarah Brown is the daughter of abolitionist, Captain John Brown. Sarah has been quietly helping her father by drawing the maps needed. One day Captain Brown led a raid on Harper’s Ferry for which he was arrested and hanged. Sarah and her family went into New Charleston to be nearby when his sentence is carried out. They are staying with George and Priscilla Hill. They have two children: Frederick and Alice. Freddy and Sarah hit it off right away and continued to write each other after Sarah went home and then to school. Sarah continued to help out the abolitionist (after her father’s death) with her maps. She was able to draw accurate maps that the slaves could follow. When they had to come up with a new way to do the maps, she drew them on doll heads. During the Civil War, Sarah and her family move out west to Red Bluff, California (their family was not welcomed in the South or by the Confederate soldiers). The Mapmaker’s Children tells Sarah’s and Eden’s stories. It is interesting how the author is able to tie the current townspeople back to the past citizens of New Charleston. I give The Mapmaker’s Children 4 out of 5 stars (I liked it). It dragged in certain parts and at one point, I wanted to shake Eden. Tell her to grow up and face reality (I got tired of her whining). There is a lot more to the book. I have only given you a brief synopsis. It is well-written and engaging. If the author had cut out the part of Jack “supposed” cheating and Eden’s whining, I would have loved it. I received a complimentary copy of The Mapmaker’s Children from NetGalley and Blogging for Books in exchange for an honest review. The review and opinions expressed are my own and not influenced by receiving the book for free.
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