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Ratings and Reviews (6 61 star ratings
6 reviews
)

Overall rating

4.1 out of 5
61
5 Stars 4 Stars 3 Stars 2 Stars 1 Stars
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  • 2 person found this review helpful

    2 people found this review helpful

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    Interesting and well researched historical fiction

    It wasn’t until I reached the end of the book that I learned that McCoy’s character Sarah Brown was in fact a real woman. Although this is a fictional account of the abolitionist’s life, it shows a great deal of research done by the author. In the beginning I found Sarah’s storyline to be rushed and skipped ahead, leaving out some background detail. I also admit it took me some time to get into this story and to warm up to Eden. However the beautiful writing and my curiosity of how the two characters would connect, kept me reading. I would recommend The Mapmaker’s Children to those who are interested in reading about the abolitionist movements and the Underground Railroad. Note: I was sent a copy of The Mapmaker's Children by Sarah' McCoy from the publisher and The TLC Book Tours in exchange for an honest review.
  • 2 person found this review helpful

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    the mapmaker's children

    so interesting learning history in the way Sarah has written. the sadness of the time is there but the love of families involved in the story keeps you reading and wishing you belonged in their closeness.
  • 2 person found this review helpful

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    Fabulous Literary

    I received a complimentary copy of this book as a part of a book tour for a fair and honest review and rated it 5 out of 5 stars and gave it a recommended read. What makes a family? Does a family only exist when there are parents and children? Or is family something we each have to define for ourselves? You might think those are strange questions to begin a book review but they’re just some of the questions I asked and answered for myself while reading The Mapmaker’s Children by Sarah McCoy. A beautifully written literary novel, Ms. McCoy’s tale is told by two very different women who were born generations apart. Alternating her characters voices by chapter, Ms. McCoy deals with some very heavy topics; slavery, freedom, human rights, infertility, marriage and family. If you like books that alternate between the past and the present, deal with important and often difficult issues, and make you laugh and then cry, this is a book you’ll want to put at the top of your reading list. Ms. McCoy begins her story by introducing us to a house in New Charlestown, Virginia. A house purchased by a father and son, who plan to “flip” it and make a profit, however as things often happen when family members attempt to do business together feelings get hurt, insults are hurled and the house sat empty for a couple more years. Ms. McCoy then introduces us to the two main characters who will tell us their stories – Sarah Brown, daughter of the famous abolitionist John Brown, and the mapmaker of the book’s title, and Eden Norton, a modern day woman dealing with infertility and a marriage that’s falling apart. While separated by time and circumstance, Eden’s life will forever be changed by what she learns about Sarah. I easily connected with Sarah’s character and found her to be intelligent, brave and determined. I had a harder time connecting to Eden, she was difficult to like at first, but she did grow on me and I eventually found myself equally invested in both women’s story. The secondary characters; Sarah’s family, friends and her “children”, along with Eden’s husband Jack Anderson, her neighbor’s granddaughter Cleo and their neighbors in New Charlestown, were all well developed and contributed a lot to both stories. Ms. McCoy did a good job blending the historical background and events that could have taken place in Sarah’s life and also did a good job with the current timeline. One of my favorite characters of course is “Cricket”, the dog Jack brings home after another attempt at IVF(Invitro) has failed, who brings everyone in the current timeline together. Will Eden discover that there’s more to “family” than blood relations? Will she give Jack, and their marriage another chance? Will Eden and Cleo’s investigation into the history of a doll they discover in the house help them uncover Sarah’s history and what happened to “her children”? You’ll have to read The Mapmaker’s Children to find out, I loved it and can’t wait to read another of Ms. McCoy’s books.
  • 2 person found this review helpful

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    Maps & CriKet BisKets

    The Mapmaker's Children has moments in it that make you want to cry, others that make you mad, and more that make you happy. It is the twisting of two intertwined stories, Sarah Brown's one of the 1850's past & Eden's one of contemporary time. The two go into a lot of detail & you feel like you are right there in the story with them. Then they are all tied in together. Sarah McCoy really sets it all up well. Sarah's family is involved in the UnderGround RailRoad, at a time when it was not safe to do so. Sarah's father John is caught, convicted and killed for his role in helping slaves escape. Sarah is an artist who makes maps for the fugitive slaves to follow. Since most cannot read, she makes simple pictures of the routes to take. Eden is caught up in a lot of turmoil, because she has always wanted a baby & has undergone fertility treatments & hormones and her life is a mess. Her husband loves her, so things will be okay, if she can get past wanting a child.
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    The Mapmakers Children

    Liked the contrast of historical situations to modern situations and the connection between them, especially in the details. An uplifting book even though the subject could be difficult.
61

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